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Thread: Nepenthes grower trying some sticky traps

  1. #9
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Covering seeds in plastic wrap and rocketing the humidity to 100% is a great way to ensure mold; they'll do just fine uncovered and will be easier to acclimate as well (because they won't need it). Also, while many Drosera well grow okay in sphagnum, most will do better in a peat-based mix, particularly one high in aerated materials such as perlite or (even better) silica sand.
    Last edited by hcarlton; 12-30-2018 at 04:42 PM.
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    nepenthesl0ve's Avatar
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    if i go the sand route, what ratio would you use? also, what is the best source for CP safe sand not labeled for horticultural use? I have most media shipped to me but prob not the best way to go for sand.

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    You want something with a larger grain size so that it aerates the media properly. Too small and it won't do that properly. Sandblasting sands can be gotten in grain sizes appropriate for this purpose. And I would mirror not bagging your seeds. It is almost never necessary, they're already humid enough from being in contact with a wet surface.

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    Man thanks guys for the help on saying I can uncover my seedlings. I definitely like the idea of them NOT being covered and certainly don't want to actually be the one to cause the mold.

    I just wonder why so much advice says otherwise. I thought I had done my research too...

    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/gro...eedgermination
    You should put the pots in plastic bags, cover them with plastic wrap, or put them in a sealed terrarium. You will know the plants are wet enough if the bags stay fogged up. Damping off is not a problem for most CPs.
    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/gro...on/sowingseeds
    Put some water in the bottom of a plastic bag and put the pot with the seeds in the bag....Instead of plastic bags you can use an old aquarium with plastic wrap on the top, a clear plastic storage box, or anything else convenient.
    And then Aaron's advice over on GrowSundews. But I admit that I seriously considered how much he meant that advice. He did seem to imply that he doesn't do it when he is available for regular waterings: http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/G...from_Seed.html
    Above left: Saran wrap was secured with tape over the container to raise the humidity and keep in the moisture while I was out of town for a month.
    As for my LFS recommendation, I only meant as seedlings. I have mine in 2-inch pots that will be repotted early on when the plant is ready for it. And repotted into a peat/silica sand mix option instead of just dead LFS. I did do some seedlings in a peat/silica mix but mostly dead LFS.

    Of course, remember the long time joke used for many hobbies. Get ten CP growers in a room and ask how to do something and you will get ten different ways to do it.
    Last edited by Odysseus; 12-30-2018 at 02:53 AM.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    The amount of sand needed in the mix is dependent on the species; most do fine with the standard 50:50 ratio, but species like filiformis and capensis often grow in sandier locations and may like it higher to aid aeration. Sandblasting sand I keep seeing as the best suggestion due to the silica content and larger grain size, but I haven't used it personally because it's a bit on the expensive side (especially for someone like me who might go through a couple bags repotting everything in the greenhouses). Pool filter sand is pure silica as well and has done decently for me, but is a little on the small side hen it comes to the grain size, and is still expensive (though not quite as much as sandblasting sand). Recently I have acquired a bag of silica play sand, which is cheap and has a huge variation of grain sizes so drainage is excellent, and so far don't see any issues (knocks on wood), but it does require a lot of rinsing first to get rid of all the unwanted particulates (until the water run through it stays relatively clear).
    I honestly don't know where the advice came from to cover seedlings, but it's probably one of those things that was recommended by an old-time grower before there were thousands of us experimenting and thus taken as law. So long as the pot is not in any danger of drying out between your watering periods (which would be a problem for grown plants too), they don't need covering. If they were outside and at the mercy of rain, wind, and in some places extreme low humidity it might be a benefit, but only so far as the pots weren't in direct sun either (something else sundews of all sizes like).
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    Odysseus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    I honestly don't know where the advice came from to cover seedlings, but it's probably one of those things that was recommended by an old-time grower before there were thousands of us experimenting and thus taken as law. So long as the pot is not in any danger of drying out between your watering periods (which would be a problem for grown plants too), they don't need covering. If they were outside and at the mercy of rain, wind, and in some places extreme low humidity it might be a benefit, but only so far as the pots weren't in direct sun either (something else sundews of all sizes like).
    Yeah I can see that. That makes a lot of sense. I always saw it as modern advice since the florescent lights were mentioned too but all in all I am totally on board with open air seedlings! I went through some of my old pictures and I have a pot of Coir and Nepenthes seeds that looks like a biology experiment in algae, sludge and organic goop. It is pretty gross and I can safely say that most of it was due to my 100% humidity levels of that pot being in a ziploc bag for months under lights.

    Thanks, guys again! I am enjoying seeing my seedlings on an eye level and NO covering!

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    nepenthesl0ve's Avatar
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    I was afraid of using play sand due to potential salt content or other impurities but if rinsing works I'll definitely go that route!

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nepenthesl0ve View Post
    I was afraid of using play sand due to potential salt content or other impurities but if rinsing works I'll definitely go that route!
    Note, only that which is labeled as pure quartz play sand; other varieties will have a mix of minerals you don't want.

    Odysseus, I would bet that heavy growth of algae etc. is more connected to too high nutrient levels in your mix (probably from the coir). Fully enclosed a pot shouldn't develop too much growth of anything unless there's stuff for it to grow on.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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