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Oct 20, 2005
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Logan, WV
Hello everyone,

Im new to the forum, (ive lurked on here for a while admiring everyones incredible plants!) but i finally decided to sign up a few days ago.

I've been growing Lowland nepenthes for about 6 years now, last year i went out on a limb and bought a few highland/intermediate hybrids (N. lowii x ventricosa red) (N. tomomi X Tiveyi) (N. truncata x ventricosa), I figured the N. lowii x ventricosa red would probably die but i had to try it anyway, To my complete surprise a year later its thriving, as are the other 2 plants.

The only other Highland/Intermediate plants I've grown are the more "adaptable" common ones (ventricosa, maxima, sanguinea, khasiana)....
I was wondering if there are any other tolerant and adaptable highland species/hybrids out there? Ive always been afraid to try Highlanders but now I'm curious about trying others.

My growing conditions are roughly 85F/29C in the day, 70F/21C at night, "way above what i would consider highland"
I think my growing temps may even be above what most would consider internediate.

here are a few of my older plants,

bicalcarata.jpg

bicalcarata
rafflesiana.jpg

(my not so gigantic) rafflesiana gigantea
dyneriana.jpg

dyneriana
truncata.jpg

truncata

Any advice on highland species/hybrids i might be able to grow under my conditions would be appreciated.

thanks
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schloaty

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Hey Donn,

There are many adaptable highlanders out there....your best bet is to look for altitude ranges on the plants.  Some that are clasified as highlanders can live fairly far down the mountain.  Sanguinea is a good example.

Also, any highland/lowland hybrids are usually a safe bet.  I have an N. x 'Miranda' which is virtually un killable.  Survived a light frost (yikes!  That was a mistake...and only overnight), and survived out (rediculous) heatwave this summer with flying colors.  The best part is that the plant is also large & showy!  Best of both worlds.

Edit: Forgot to say: Great plants you have there! Looks like your thumb is green enough to start branching out (NPI).
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
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Location
Logan, WV
Hi Everyone,

 Schloaty,.. Thats good advice looking at the altitude ranges of the plants in question ( i never really though about that)  And also safety in growing highland/lowland hybrids,...Im really anxious to try lowii x truncata. or even truncata x aristolochioides,.. i love aristolochioides but my growing conditions are waaay to warm to grow it

  Chesara, Thanks
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  In the next few days i'll take more pics of some of my other plants, and post them.

  thanks again guys!
 
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My N. fusca 'Sarawak' tolerates our summer weather (lows typically 65F+; highs typically 85F+) as well as my N. ventricosa and N. maxima do. Plus it tolerates stronger light and keeps pitchering in lower light.
 
Joined
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Logan, WV
srduggins: thank you for that link!!!!
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 The info on that thread is really helpfull!!  I'll be sure to take some new pics and post them of my highland hybrids within the next few days.  

 BTW your (N. tomomi X Tiveyi) looks really different from mine, its cool how theres so much variation in that hybrid

 herenorthere: thanks for the info, Ive always liked N. fusca, I have 2 diffrent ventricosas one in the greenhouse and one in a grow chamber, the one inside does well all year but the one in the greenhouse stops pitchering in the middle of summer, although it continues to grow.

  thanks everyone!
 
Joined
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Messages
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Logan, WV
Thanks rattler_mt,

I just put in an order for one and a few highland hybrids early this morning, Ive always wanted to grow either ramispina, or bongso ( i love the nearly black pitchers! ) I asked Tony what he thought and he favored the bongso as well
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Thanks for the info!
 
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