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An obvious improvement! Nice.
Thank you! I was pretty worried for the little guy, since it was experiencing rapid decline, and had no full healthy leaves, but man are Drosera good at recovery from the roots. I just figured I'd share my current experience in case anyone else might benefit from bagging theirs.

Btw, like the others said, your hot tank setup is awesome. The plants look great! What are those three spiral shaped ones? They look like little galaxies.
 

bluemax

Lotsa blue
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What are those three spiral shaped ones? They look like little galaxies.

That one is D. derbyensis. Actually, that pot is being fussy and not wanting to produce traps right now. I've been trying to encourage them with some top-watering and Maxsea applied to the leaves. They're not really ready for a closeup.
 
Joined
Jul 1, 2016
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AaJyZeu.jpg
LkJQzYZ.jpg
Here's some Derbyensis and Ordensis I have growing in my hot tank.
 
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Jul 1, 2016
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Those are some sweet plants! What is your growing setup like? Meaning - temps., light source?



temps are 75-80f low 90f high (I wouldnt mind getting it higher than that). Light sources are both LED and CFL, the CFL is mainly in the tank for heat. 95+ Humidity, completely domed off.
 
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Mar 22, 2016
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Israel
Here's a quicky - what do you use to print the labels? Are they weather and sun proof?

Sent from my LG-H815 using Tapatalk
 
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Mar 11, 2010
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572
D. falconeri flowering:
55655548-6AFB-4C9E-B30D-DDDFDD9B5BBB_zpsqqorrzcz.jpg

4CBC1547-4EE9-4E02-B7D2-5CBF7AB9D5D0_zpsp0xj5jfj.jpg

It's from Carnivoria. If anyone has any different clones of this species in flower, or has pollen from them, send me a message. Same goes for anyone with any petiolaris dews in flower right now.
 
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Joined
Nov 10, 2013
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Location
Hacienda Heights, CA USA
Drosera caduca (just came back from dormancy - thought it was dead a month ago)

gxfu9s9.jpg


Drosera lanata

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Drosera derbyensis

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The plants were repotted into a larger container shortly after these pictures were taken. Apparently it gets hot enough on the windowsill to fry Utricularia cornuta.
 

bluemax

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About bottom heat

Sometime ago, maybe a year or so?, I decided that the heating mat I had on my petiolaris terrarium was just not enough to produce the temperatures I wanted for the plants I had in there. I already had the first mat stuck onto the back of the tank and so I chose to put the new one on the bottom. Now, I have had some experience with sundews and bottom heat and it wasn't a good experience. The plants stopped producing dew and when I was convinced the heat coming from underneath was the problem I terminated the experiment and the plants recovered. My solution was to try to insulate the watering trays for the Petiolaris sundews from the heat by sitting them on reflective bubble-type insulation. Long story shortened: my plants began a long downslide and additions I made to the collection at that time never grew normally, some never even producing complete traps.

Recently, after trying everything else I could think of, I removed the mat from the bottom and put it on the front of the tank. I was desperate enough to do this finally! Guess what? The plants are back on the upswing and species that have never done well for me are putting out new growth. Some are even producing the first dewy traps they have ever had for me. I expect the improvements to continue.

Moral of the story? While I can't say across the board that bottom heating sundews will bring disaster I can say that it can in at least some circumstances. If you are using a heat mat to heat a tank I would recommend that you do it from the side, despite it looking kind of funky. Bottom heat can sometimes, for some plants, bring more rapid rooting of cuttings so I don't mean to say it is to be avoided in all cases.

If things continue to improve I will consider my plants to be photogenic before too long. In this case I will post photos here in celebration. Thank you for reading this. For those of you who also grow plants from this group I wish you success! There are still too few of us.
 

bluemax

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Back from the dead, indeed. It seems the job and life in general has taken me away from some of the things I love the most, including petiolaris sundews. I think when last I posted Photobucket had established their policy of suppressing any photos hosted by them unless you paid, which means most of those on this thread were gone. Then came the add-on that allowed you to view them without paying and now they are back for free, albeit with their name tagged. I'm good with that and just happy to see things restored.

But, my collection of petiolaris 'dews continues to grow and to improve - though they were kind of ratty after the summer for some reason. I will be posting some photos before long. Really.

I noticed a question above that was not answered concerning pot tags. I have found that standard #2 pencil seems to last better than anything else I have found for writing labels. Another trick is to stick the top of the tag just under the surface of the soil and it will be protected from the uv light that will ultimately destroy it and make it brittle. Then you can pull it up to read it. You may have to cut down the tag to make it fit in smaller pots. I get the longer tags and cut them in two.
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
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Location
Moonlight Flat, Victoria, Australia
Drosera petiolairs in the wild (photo)

Here's a picture I took some years ago when I lived in Darwin.

Darwin has a Wet Season (lots of rain, temperatures 25 to 32 degrees Celsius) and a Dry Season (no rain, temperatures 18 to 34 degrees Celsius, very low humidity). The petiolaris complex Drosera die off above ground during the Dry Season. Being close to equator, there isn't that much variation in day length (the Wet Season peaks around December to February when days are slightly longer.

D petiolaris.jpg
 

bluemax

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Awesome to see woollys in their native habitat! So sorry to hear that the falconeri site was developed. I agree that the one looks like a hybrid of D. falconeri. Thanks for posting.
 

adnedarn

I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az
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Thanks for sharing the photos and details of the environment! Beautiful! :water: Do you know if the ground is as sandy as it looks down through the root zone or if it is just the top layer?
 
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Moonlight Flat, Victoria, Australia
Thanks for sharing the photos and details of the environment! Beautiful! :water: Do you know if the ground is as sandy as it looks down through the root zone or if it is just the top layer?

It's been over 10 years since I took the photos and I'm not a soil expert. However, I extracted the following from a blurb on soil types in the Northern Territory which accords with what I do remember:

"In the Northern Territory, soil types range from massive red and yellow earths to shallow ironstone gravels. There are considerable areas of shallow stony and sandy soils interspersed with massive red and yellow earths throughout the top end. Surface textures range from sands to clay loams.".

The area where the photos were taken receives about 1500 mm (about 60 inches) of rain in a few month, so the soil generally drains pretty quickly.

Here's a picture of Drosera growing in a particularly pebbly area:

Drosera darwinensis.jpg
 

bluemax

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Kick start

So after all of this time I finally have my petiolaris terrarium in a state worthy of photography. Hope you all enjoy. Feel free to post any photos of your own petiolaris 'dews.

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Left side.

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Right side.

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Drosera darwinensis

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D. aff. lanata "Flying Fox Creek"

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D. aff. lanata "Flying Fox Creek"

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D. lanata

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D. ordensis

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D. fulva

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D. brevicornis

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D. falconeri

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D. paradoxa (swamp form)

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D. broomensis
 
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