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Are these in your Pots and Greenhouse?

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Ever see any Brahminy Blind Snake aka Flower Pot Snake Ramphotyphlops braminus or Greenhouse Frogs Eleutherodactylus planirostris in your growing area, or while working on your plants?

Info: Brahminy blind snake videos, photos and facts - Ramphotyphlops braminus | ARKive
snake_blind_common.jpg


Info: AmphibiaWeb - Eleutherodactylus planirostris
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bluemax

Lotsa blue
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While I have never seen the cool species in your photos we do have the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) here in the Pacific Northwestern US. I took this photo at an area greenhouse. They are serious croakers.

P7135594.jpg
 
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Nope! Neat trick teaching him to sit on a dime though, impressive!
Not my photo, so I can't take credit. I've actually never seen the snakes but I would see and hear Greenhouse frogs when I lived in Miami, FL. Both are supposed to be very common in the US though, and I just got to wondering if any of you have come across them.

While I have never seen the cool species in your photos we do have the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla) here in the Pacific Northwestern US. I took this photo at an area greenhouse. They are serious croakers.
Super nice photo! Cute frog too! We have so many beautiful native species in the US!
The two animals I mentioned are non native animals and I've often pondered trying to keep some as pets. I've heard they live in Ga, but haven't seen much evidence of that. Although, I think I saw a Greenhouse frog at a community garden once. We are getting some rain right now, maybe I'll try and find the lil guy tonight.
 
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The snake is everywhere down here in south Florida. Subterranean, so I've only seen them twice.
 
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Yeah I've only seen them a handful of times but they're supposedly very common

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Yes, I have found these snakes under some rocks in my backyard, here in Texas we call them rough earth snakes. They are really friendly and eat small bugs. If you manage to find one, do not kill it, they eat small pest (mainly slugs)!


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Yes, I have found these snakes under some rocks in my backyard, here in Texas we call them rough earth snakes. They are really friendly and eat small bugs. If you manage to find one, do not kill it, they eat small pest (mainly slugs)!

Aren't "rough earth snakes" Haldea striatula? They are found in Texas and are native to the USA.
 
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Aren't "rough earth snakes" Haldea striatula? They are found in Texas and are native to the USA.

Yes they are but they are so similar I consider them one type of snake to be more simplistic.


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The snake is everywhere down here in south Florida. Subterranean, so I've only seen them twice.
Yeah I've only seen them a handful of times but they're supposedly very common
Where did you two see them?

Yes they are but they are so similar I consider them one type of snake to be more simplistic.
. . . they are quite different, being native vs non native, different sizes, different color, different scale texture, etc., etc. However they are both cryptic and not easily found. I've never seen H. striatula, so it's cool that you've even seen one!
 
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Where did you two see them?


. . . they are quite different, being native vs non native, different sizes, different color, different scale texture, etc., etc. However they are both cryptic and not easily found. I've never seen H. striatula, so it's cool that you've even seen one!
I've seen them in different parts of Miami either while digging or while flipping over some rocks

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I get tree frogs and Anoles in my greenhouse. The frogs hang out in pitchers just like the one in the photo. I once caught a Anole giving N. Ventricosa x Dubia a rim-job:0o:
 
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Isnt that blind snake actually a type of amphibian?
There are amphibians like Caecilians (and a few others species) that you might be thinking of. But Brahminy Blind Snakes are an invasive species that is all snake, and 100% reptile. I'll repost the link (from my fist post) with info, for anyone confused on what I'm referring to, please check it out: Brahminy blind snake videos, photos and facts - Ramphotyphlops braminus | Arkive :D

I get tree frogs and Anoles in my greenhouse. The frogs hang out in pitchers just like the one in the photo. I once caught a Anole giving N. Ventricosa x Dubia a rim-job
It's been found that Anoles will sometimes eat nectar and fruit. The anole must have been enjoying the pitcher's nectar. I would have never thought that might be a source for them.
As for greenhouse frogs, many of you might not have seen them, but you may have heard their call. Check it out: Greenhouse Frog Call in Orchid House 2014 04 27 15 18 31 - YouTube If you've heard that call, you've got greenhouse frogs!
 
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Where did you two see them?


. . . they are quite different, being native vs non native, different sizes, different color, different scale texture, etc., etc. However they are both cryptic and not easily found. I've never seen H. striatula, so it's cool that you've even seen one!

Yea, they're beauties! Their mouths are so small they can barley bite you, but they are friendly and naturally tame (at least in my experiences)!


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There are amphibians like Caecilians (and a few others species) that you might be thinking of. But Brahminy Blind Snakes are an invasive species that is all snake, and 100% reptile. I'll repost the link (from my fist post) with info, for anyone confused on what I'm referring to, please check it out: Brahminy blind snake videos, photos and facts - Ramphotyphlops braminus | Arkive :D

It is nonnative; species are only labeled invasive if they are deemed actually detrimental to a measurable degree in the introduced habitat. As blind snakes eat ants and do little else, they generally don't qualify.
 
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It is nonnative; species are only labeled invasive if they are deemed actually detrimental to a measurable degree in the introduced habitat. As blind snakes eat ants and do little else, they generally don't qualify.

The terms can be argued as how they apply to various animals including the Brahminy Blind Snake. Plus, the impact that Brahminy Blind Snakes are having on various environments and native animals it's still not yet fully known. If you'd like to further discuss this topic, please post up a new thread and PM me the link. :)

That aside, have you found any in your pots or greenhouse? If so, please post up! :D
 
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As quoted: "As per Executive Order 13112 an "invasive species" is defined as a species that is: 1) non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration and. 2) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health."
Two criteria, and this species has in no case yet examined fit the latter.

While I love snakes, if I were to find one in my pots it would actually be a bad thing, because it would not survive long here (no ants in my house, and since they're tropical it wouldn't live long outdoors).
 
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As quoted: "As per Executive Order 13112 an "invasive species" is defined as a species that is: 1) non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration and. 2) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health."
Two criteria, and this species has in no case yet examined fit the latter.

I've read many of your posts, and I'm cool with you, but I kindly asked that you to open your own topic if you wanted to discuss this further (and if definitions are very important to you, then it well deserves it's own topic!). I'm even open to a discussion via PM if you'd like. :)
I'm not trying to be rude, and I hope you don't take it that way. ;)

As for everyone else (and getting back on topic), please share your experiences with Greenhouse Frogs and Brahminy Blind Snakes. :D
 
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