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Are things Pinguicula ready for leaf pullings?

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Jul 12, 2014
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I want a pot full of Pinguicula, so I've decided to look into propagation with leaf pulling

I understand that they need to be in those winter succulent form leafs.

Are this Pinguicula ready?? Thanks!

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Ras

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usually best to wait till the end of dormancy since they are still using the leaves to store reserve water during the dryness. and the plant in the last pic seems to still be in carnivore mode but I could be wrong, btw what species is that last plant.
 
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okay, I will wait. Maybe until end of Feb or March?

Uhmmm, you know I thought about the same thing too. It's been kept dry as long as the other two plants. It's not going dormant is it? It's a Pinguicula laueana
 
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normally P. laueana must be dormant now.... perhaps she's going to be dormant...
but in your last pictures, the leaf are really big and it's not a winter rosette... don't you see no very small leaves on the center ? it is strange because approximatively in 2 or 3 month this would be the end of dormant period...
its depends the condition you give to your plant.... too much light , too long time with light, and too high temperatures make she don't going dormant.
you can take leaf all year long, but i prefere to take leaf when they are carnivorous... its more easy..
 
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all the Pinguicula are next to each other. Receiving 12 hour lights, Room Temp Max - 60~65 Min 50~55.

I stopped watering them together, soo I don't know what happened. Maybe I should email the vendor.
 
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i think you can take leaf for the P. laueana to try propagation.
perhaps she just need an adaptation time to her new environmental conditions...
do you use artificial light ? or just sun ?
 
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SubRosa

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12 hours of light tells a temperate plant that it's spring or fall. 10 hours is a more suitable photoperiod for winter.
 

Joseph Clemens

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Actually, I've had nearly 100% success propagating Mexican/equatorial Pinguicula, from leaf-pullings. It never really mattered as to what leaf form the plants were in, at the time I took the pullings. I've propagated many hundreds, perhaps thousands, of plantlets from both summer and winter leaf forms. The most important factor, is to control the moisture/humidity in the immediate vicinity of the severed leaves. Too damp and they will quickly rot, before forming plantlets, too dry and they will dry up, before forming plantlets. Besides, many of these are homophyllous, and only ever have "summer" leaves.
 
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i'm not Sure, but you can also try to reduce the light's time....
i dont think water change something,..... because mine going dormant themself, and that only when i see they are going dormant , that i beginn to reduce water ....
it is logik after all....how plants should know it is winter time ? easy... day and daylight are more small, and temperatures going down too... (in my opinion 12H light is too much for winter time )
but dont worry..it's not a big problem..
 
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good luck... i'm sure you doing well...and have some new plantelets in one month maximum...
take the leaf slowly, and take if its possible the entire leaf with the with part...
 

Ras

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huh. very cool looking P. laueana. it has a purplish color to it ive never seen before on that species. maybe my screen color is off. but the leaf shape and the veins look spot on to P. laueana. could it be a hybrid?
anyways as far as getting it to go dormant I wouldnt worry too much. some species simply refuse to be forced into dormancy and will do it on their own time, ive had a yucca 1717 do this to me many times.. like others said though reducing light along with water is your best chance, they can handle low water during carnivorous stage so only lowering water may or may not be enough to put plant into dormancy, but lowering the water and light usually does the trick.I assume because at that time of year in nature the light will ALWAYS reduce because of the distance from the sun or whatever, but rainfall can vary and you could have a very dry growing season some years, so in order to not mistake that false alarm as a reason to go dormant they sometimes need more than one signal to go dormant..least thats what I get from it. And as far as I can tell temperatures dont seem to have any effect on their dormancy considering mine will grow or go dormant in just about any livable temperature.
 
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exactly Ras, i completly agree with your opinion...
my pings decided themselfs when they want to go dormant... and the only who changes alone without i'm doing nothing, is the number of sunny hours in a day...
so i think this is THE factor who makes pings going dormant...
and this P. laueana is also violet on my screen... and this is the first time i could see this color for a p. laueana ;)
Good luck Ps3isawesome with your leaf's pulling
 
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so I moved this ping onto my windowsill. Which gets less hours of daylight than under my artificial grow light. Hopefully this will do.

I'm not sure if this is a hybrid..... totally newbie to pings.

Thanks guys for all the reply.

One thing, do you guys just pull the leafs out with your finger? or with a pair of tiny tweezers?
 

Joseph Clemens

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I like to do my leaf-pullings in conjunction with repotting. I like to take most of the outer, older leaves, leaving only a central core of the newer leaves. When I received my first plants of Pinguicula gigantea, though they were small plants, I removed all but the central four or five leaves, using all the older leaves for propagation. This set the "parent" plants, back, a little. The leaf-pullings developed well, and by the time the parent plants had recovered, they and the propagules were nearly the same size.

This is a photo of the three original plants of Pinguicula gigantea, I first received. By the time of this photo, there were about a half dozen propagules (of each), created via leaf-pullings of these three original clones - they were nearly the same size as these parent plants. Time lapsed, about two months.

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I usually try with my fingers first. Go easy at first and see if you can see where the leaf is giving from. Usually with small or tougher leaves I will use tweezers so I can grab closer to the base, but be gentle with your grip on the leaf. I don't have the best hands for this kind of stuff so when the pings are in winter leaf form I almost always use tweezers, just can't grab anything otherwise.

I take pullings any time of year though, leaf form doesn't make a difference to me. Carnivorous leaves seem a bit easier to deal with and handle. But on the other side a lot of species seem to have more leaves available in their winter forms, if they have one.

As far as the laueana going into winter form I would just shorten the photoperiod on the lights and let the plant do its thing, water it until it changes forms. Some plants seem more reluctant to switch over than others, I've always been told to just sort of leave them be though.
 
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Ps3isawesome, in my advice, it is better to take your finger, or you will probably hurt the leaf...
make it slowly, take the leaf between your fingers, and take the leaf slowly to the right....not to much...and then come back...and go to the left....and so on...
sometimes up and down...and normally the leaf comes in one piece...
just make slowly...and with your other hand, make the plant stay on his place...
good luck... never to much hard, and it will be ok... ;) .....it is very easy
 
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