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Byblis Study

Joined
Feb 13, 2015
Messages
123
Location
Southern California
This B. filifolia proved easy to grow. But the plant is very complicated to reproduce with its seed germination and pollination requirements. I see that, as is written, the flower of B. filifolia does not automatically release pollen onto its own stigma. Also, I read filifolia must be cross pollinated to make seed. I hand pollinated my one plant, so I don’t expect any. I know from experience that the easy to grow B. liniflora pollinates itself and makes good seed.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,632
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Self-pollination definitely won't produce anything; pollen isn't particularly difficult to acquire though if the plant has properly developed flowers, flicking the anthers with a toothpick will make it drop pollen on whatever's underneath the anthers (I usually use a fingernail or sheet of wax paper to collect and then use as a platform to scrape it off and move to a different flower). You can also store the pollen frozen so I'm told, to use later on a different clone if you only have room for one at a time. B. liniflora is the easiest to pollinate as it does on its own, aquatica will also very easily self-pollinate but requires manual pollinating of the flower most of the time. The rest all need to be crossed. I just got in a bunch of new forms of the species, hopefully will get them growing and set up a seed stock that I can start distributing from.
Also, it's a bit touchier as the resulting plants can be a bit lankier and less appealing to look at, but most of the Byblis species can be propagated via stem cuttings. The perennials take to this method best 9and thus far are also the ones that care the least about if roots are damaged in transplanting etc.).
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2015
Messages
123
Location
Southern California
Self-pollination definitely won't produce anything; pollen isn't particularly difficult to acquire though if the plant has properly developed flowers, flicking the anthers with a toothpick will make it drop pollen on whatever's underneath the anthers (I usually use a fingernail or sheet of wax paper to collect and then use as a platform to scrape it off and move to a different flower). You can also store the pollen frozen so I'm told, to use later on a different clone if you only have room for one at a time. B. liniflora is the easiest to pollinate as it does on its own, aquatica will also very easily self-pollinate but requires manual pollinating of the flower most of the time. The rest all need to be crossed. I just got in a bunch of new forms of the species, hopefully will get them growing and set up a seed stock that I can start distributing from.
Also, it's a bit touchier as the resulting plants can be a bit lankier and less appealing to look at, but most of the Byblis species can be propagated via stem cuttings. The perennials take to this method best 9and thus far are also the ones that care the least about if roots are damaged in transplanting etc.).
Thanks for the additional info. I’m toying with the idea of raising up a B. liniflora to cross with my one filifolia. But of more interest, I have seed of B. aquatica to smoke treat next.
Byblis graft 5.16.21b.JPG
Another experiment I did recently was graft an extra Byblis plant I had onto a non CP, to test the possible relation. Here is a photo: Byblis on African Violet (Saintpaulia ionantha). Google images and compare flowers of Byblis and African Violet and you’ll see the structure appears the same. However, my graft failed.
 
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