What's new

Carnivorous Plant Library (PLEASE HELP!!!)

Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
273
Location
San Diego C.A. United States
Hello I am a beginner in the hobby and new to this forum HI ALL!!!! A true way to learn is to ask as much experts as I can find bout the best of the best ground braking books written on the subject. Please help me build a carnivorous plant library, I am looking for books on beginners all the way to advanced levels. I would like to read on EVERYTHING about them, about ALL SPECIES, proper husbandry, possible parasites, pro husbandry techniques and everything else under the sun, I am looking to take this seriously I hope within 1 1/2 year of study, so all the help I can get will be fantastic, also If anyone would know about a carnivorous plant 101 book or writing please let me know, it seems best to start with the 101s
THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Oh If you guys would know of the best botany college books out right now please tell me, not too specific with 1 or a few topics in botany but a fulll rich broad detailed informative book in all aspects of botany it would help me better! THanks aagain!~~!!!!!

PS It better for me to actually learn botany 1rst before carnivorous plants but I still want the carnivore books thansk!
 
Last edited:

EdaxFlamma

The Consuming Flame
Joined
May 17, 2007
Messages
487
Location
DE
There are a bunch of good books out there on CPs. Search engines are our friends ;)

Personally, I have found that sometimes things can become out dated in books (CP books or even college text books) so I tend to frequent my school library for specific books I need (or to decide what I want in my own library). I will say that Barry Rice's FAQ is pretty close to an online text book and I would greatly recommend it: http://www.sarracenia.com/faq.html

Another publication I would recommend if you are looking for some more scholarly articles is the ICPS newsletter. They provide a lot of up to date info and more of the nitty-gritty facts a figures not to mention you get access to all the back issues (and a few other perks) with membership!

Not exactly what you were looking for but hope this helps a bit,
-J.P.
 
Joined
Nov 18, 2006
Messages
536
Location
Miami, FL
The two must have CP books: The Savage Garden by Peter D'Amato and Growing Carnivorous Plants by Barry Rice. The Savage Garden may be on the old side but it covers a lot of the basics while Growing Carnivorous Plants is a lot more recent and has a lot of additional information not found in The Savage Garden.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2002
Messages
8,124
Location
Cernunnos Woods
Books are a good source of habitat information and some general clues to cultivation but really the best information source is the forums where questions can be answered as problems arise, or even better, so they never do. Books just aren't this interactive. That said, I do buy every CP book I come across, buy 'em all - why not?! :D Savage garden was my first but I probably have 30 or so now just on CPs.

My best advice is to listen to the most successful growers who have grown their plants a long time (more than a year) and are getting consistent results. If someone is growing their plants in an inappropriate environment and "getting away with it". Chances are they have not been getting away with it for a whole year or longer. Take their advice with a grain of salt and don't assume you'll be able to "get away with it" too, unless you're prepared to loose the plant. Depending upon what species you decide to specialize in will determine the needful extravagance of your setup. Highland Nepenthes species being some of the most finicky (but the coolest to me). And at the prices of some of them, I was never willing to risk it growing in the wrong environment.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
273
Location
San Diego C.A. United States
Books are a good source of habitat information and some general clues to cultivation but really the best information source is the forums where questions can be answered as problems arise, or even better, so they never do. Books just aren't this interactive. That said, I do buy every CP book I come across, buy 'em all - why not?! :D Savage garden was my first but I probably have 30 or so now just on CPs.

My best advice is to listen to the most successful growers who have grown their plants a long time (more than a year) and are getting consistent results. If someone is growing their plants in an inappropriate environment and "getting away with it". Chances are they have not been getting away with it for a whole year or longer. Take their advice with a grain of salt and don't assume you'll be able to "get away with it" too, unless you're prepared to loose the plant. Depending upon what species you decide to specialize in will determine the needful extravagance of your setup. Highland Nepenthes species being some of the most finicky (but the coolest to me). And at the prices of some of them, I was never willing to risk it growing in the wrong environment.

actually I was thining on specializing on a little bit of all of them, cuz to be honest I do like them all!! i'm sure i share the enthusiasm with others, do u specialize in a specific kind? your library is a dream to me, do u have specific subjects on CP care like the best soil mixtures and palnting procedures, maybe u can gimme advice on specifics in the long run:
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
273
Location
San Diego C.A. United States
Books are a good source of habitat information and some general clues to cultivation but really the best information source is the forums where questions can be answered as problems arise, or even better, so they never do. Books just aren't this interactive. That said, I do buy every CP book I come across, buy 'em all - why not?! :D Savage garden was my first but I probably have 30 or so now just on CPs.

My best advice is to listen to the most successful growers who have grown their plants a long time (more than a year) and are getting consistent results. If someone is growing their plants in an inappropriate environment and "getting away with it". Chances are they have not been getting away with it for a whole year or longer. Take their advice with a grain of salt and don't assume you'll be able to "get away with it" too, unless you're prepared to loose the plant. Depending upon what species you decide to specialize in will determine the needful extravagance of your setup. Highland Nepenthes species being some of the most finicky (but the coolest to me). And at the prices of some of them, I was never willing to risk it growing in the wrong environment.

Oh yes I'd like to add that I support your notion that the best is to come to the forum to learn better with Cps but then since I am a beginenr I would like to be somewhat even a little knowledgeable bout them before i get serious in the forum so the experts dun start to clown meeeh somehow lol, but I think this forums has some CP 101 information that I am definitely checking out
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2002
Messages
8,124
Location
Cernunnos Woods
Yes, I have genus books, books which specialize in one type of carnivore, like the Charles Clarke Nepenthes book series, the Genus Urticularia by Taylor, etc. Really the monographs as they are called don't have much/anything by way of detailed cultivation info, but rather descriptions like "Peduncle 16.5 cm, lamina hirsute, cordate 23 cm x 18 cm,..." with a quick summing up of the general appearance. Things like how to rig up a growing area indoors for plants who want to be cool and moist year round, species specific soil mixes, etc. That's what forums are great for, the nitty gritty practical info. Books are good to learn their habitats and forums are good to learn how to simulate them.

My own specialty was Nepenthes "highland" (cool growing) and "lowland" (warm growing) species. I grew them along with orchids for about six or seven years but when my dads heart failed in late 2006 I was spending a lot of time at the hospital and had to give up these care intensive plants. I have got back into growing exotics again but right now I'm growing the weirdest looking succulents I can find (mainly mesmeb and asclepiad groups).

From one extreme to the other! :D
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2009
Messages
273
Location
San Diego C.A. United States
Yes, I have genus books, books which specialize in one type of carnivore, like the Charles Clarke Nepenthes book series, the Genus Urticularia by Taylor, etc. Really the monographs as they are called don't have much/anything by way of detailed cultivation info, but rather descriptions like "Peduncle 16.5 cm, lamina hirsute, cordate 23 cm x 18 cm,..." with a quick summing up of the general appearance. Things like how to rig up a growing area indoors for plants who want to be cool and moist year round, species specific soil mixes, etc. That's what forums are great for, the nitty gritty practical info. Books are good to learn their habitats and forums are good to learn how to simulate them.

My own specialty was Nepenthes "highland" (cool growing) and "lowland" (warm growing) species. I grew them along with orchids for about six or seven years but when my dads heart failed in late 2006 I was spending a lot of time at the hospital and had to give up these care intensive plants. I have got back into growing exotics again but right now I'm growing the weirdest looking succulents I can find (mainly mesmeb and asclepiad groups).

From one extreme to the other! :D
I understand, man i really need to do some research on this cus i duno half of what u described with the species u mentioned, well maybe i do but just by looks, all i know are the pitcher plants, flytraps, and the ones with like sticky bubbles on them, i duno any scientific names yet though. This forums seems to be oen of the greatest in the whole net, the views and responses are sooo much, i am a member of various forums and I never seen such responses well maybe exept a few like the reptile forums, do u think it is possible to set up an automated terratium for CPs? I mean u know how in the hobby of artificial aquarium reef building they set up everything needed like the chemicals, temp controls, lighting, how much chemical is released, even I think bacteria monitoring. It is a lot of electricity and resources, but it takes out the everyday hands on labor (that can be grueling) it will stillbe monitored but not too the extent of like a full time job
 
Top