What's new

Cephalotus back from the dead

nightsky

Lover of Mountains
Joined
Dec 9, 2007
Messages
1,408
Location
near Salt Lake City
6 months ago I transplanted my cephalotus(es?) into bigger pots as their pots weren't deep enough (4") and their roots were starting to come out the bottom. Well one of them didn't take kindly to the transplant and appeared to be dead within a couple weeks. The others did fine, one in fact had a growth spurt. But this particular plant shriveled up and looked completely dead. I've had luck with nepenthes looking bad and then coming out in the end, so I didn't give up hope. I cut it to the soil line and just kept taking care of as usual.

Well, it worked! After almost 5 months of no sign of life, it just recently started putting out new growth, and it looks promising! Several new growth points are showing up now. Cephalotus really are tough little buggers.

Exact plant not long before the transplant:
DSC_0239.jpg


And now:
DSC_2217.jpg

DSC_2218.jpg
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
1,838
Carnivorous plants always do suprise, don't they? I remember when I thought that my plants would die if I looked at them wrong.
 

Baylorguy

"Oh, now he's a philosophizer"
Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
942
Location
Helotes, Texas
Glad to see it is still chugging along. I had to repot my Hummer's Giant and it dropped about half of the pitchers, but seems to be doing better. They are tough plants, but they are very sensitive when it comes to transplanting them.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2011
Messages
297
Location
Istanbul, Turkey
From what I've seen, many CPs tend to come back from the roots. One of those things I love about them.

However, I find it very sad and worrying that your original plant died down like that. Can a transplant cause so much damage ? Could it be something else ?

Also I'm wondering if it has something to do with the soil mix. Some mixes tend to be finer and it's hard to seperate the roots (If one wants to seperate, that is), some thin roots break easily and this may be the major reason of the plant's stress. I'm just guessing of course; haven't moved mine yet.
 
Top