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DJ57

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I noticed this one today when snapping photos of the bog plants, a double pitcher on my S. "Red Minor"!

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[/url]Red Minor double pitcher by Djoni C, on Flickr[/IMG]
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[/url]IMG_5535 by Djoni C, on Flickr[/IMG]
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[/url]IMG_5532.jpgx1 by Djoni C, on Flickr[/IMG]
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[/url]IMG_5538.jpgx1 by Djoni C, on Flickr[/IMG]

"Red Minor" is S. minor x (purpurea x psittacina). At a glance it has the appearance of a pure S. minor except for its intense red color when grown in full sun.

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[/url]Sarracenia "Red Minor" by Djoni C, on Flickr[/IMG]
 
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It will look like a D. Binata when it opens! What if you pollinated that Sarracenia with somebody elses with this to increase the chance of this happening, thus creating some weird Sarracenia with double pitchers!
 
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It will look like a D. Binata when it opens! What if you pollinated that Sarracenia with somebody elses with this to increase the chance of this happening, thus creating some weird Sarracenia with double pitchers!

I think that all Sarracenia have the chance to produce double pitchers. There could be a certain gene that makes this occurence more likely, but I don't think crossing plants that have a double pitcher on them would make it consistent.
 
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I think that all Sarracenia have the chance to produce double pitchers. There could be a certain gene that makes this occurence more likely, but I don't think crossing plants that have a double pitcher on them would make it consistent.

Ah well, it would be cool if there was a Sarracenia with consistant double pitchers
 

DJ57

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Interesting. How often does this occur?

First time for me, but I have seen pics of others who have experienced this on sarracenia. I have had these "Red Minors" for a few years now and they have not produced any deformed pitchers before. I think is it a rare occurrence and probably caused by some environmental factor affecting the growth point as the pitcher is forming. I have had double traps on VFT a number of times and also temperate drosera, but never before on any of my sarracenia.

It will look like a D. Binata when it opens! What if you pollinated that Sarracenia with somebody elses with this to increase the chance of this happening, thus creating some weird Sarracenia with double pitchers!

Not interested in creating more mutant freaks, haha, but it will be interesting to see how this one develops.
 
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I had a fully-fused double pitcher this year but unfortunately it didn't get very large. This one is on a Sarracenia "Appalachian Spring"

kcugetn.jpg
 
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Very interesting growth on these; most I see are fused almost all the way to the top and just have separate lids or mouths, not a third of the way down the pitcher like that. It will be very cool to see it mature.
And the propensity to produce double pitchers is definitely not genetic, it's simply a random somatic mutation that can be seen in just about any plant (I've seen it in Dionaea, Drosera, Utricularia, Nepenthes, etc.)
 
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