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Cindy

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From my records, they could be any of the following...but what exactly? TIA!!!

D. spatulata
D. tokaiensis (Kagoshima, Japan)
D. rotundifolia
D. intermedia (Roraima, Venezuela)
D. nidiformis







 

Not a Number

Hello, I must be going...
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best guess at this point
1) D. tokaiensis
2) D. intermedia
3) D. nidiformis
4) D. rotundifolia - the flat margin on the petiole (see leaf at 3:15 O'Clock) is pretty typical

Flower and seeds will reveal all :p
 
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Doesn't D. nidiformis have more of a flat top the leaf and not a slightly pointed tip? It also has a dip in the leaf most of the time and I don't see that in pic #3.

I also find that young D. rotundifolia plants have much wider lamina than pic #4, such as the one in this pic found on Google images: http://www.asergeev.com/pictures/archives/2013/1242/jpeg/03.jpg I'm actually going to change my #4 vote to D. intermedia because it looks very close to D. intermedia seedlings I have seen such as these I also found on a Google search: http://i343.photobucket.com/albums/o473/klasac1/carnies/intermedia.jpg
 

Not a Number

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D. rotundifolia varies a lot depending on where it is from. Plants from colder climates tend to have shorter petioles from those in warmer areas. The alpine plants like those from Grass Lake or Lake Tahoe region are much more compact than those from Big Lagoon, CA.

The leaves on D. nidiformis are curved or bowed so the shape looks different depending on the lighting and angle of view.

This photo illustrates the bowing (pardon the blur)
IMGP7024_zpsdcf77470.jpg

Taken from this angle the leaf looks like this
IMGP7023_zpsf56f8720.jpg


Here is another leaf (not as curved) from different angles
IMGP7026_zps7e4d3a90.jpg

IMGP7019_zpsfd3a4882.jpg

IMGP7025_zps55163d45.jpg


These were taken in sunlight. If I used a flash it would have made the leaves appear even flatter and any curvature less obvious. It's because of curvatures like this that naturalists will flatten leave specimens to use for their illustrations.
 
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Hmm, I'm still skeptical.

I took a couple pictures of a recently transplanted D. intermedia "Cuba" that looks younger than Cindy's, but you can see the leaf shape is almost exactly the same.

Here they are compared:
drosera_unknown4_zps571a9b22.jpg
12686499893_535c8ced9a_z.jpg


12686367275_d7c20fcc1e_z.jpg


With D. nidiformis, you're be able to see the dip/bowing no matter what the lighting conditions are like because the tentacles lean inwards at the middle. I can't see any bowing in Cindy's pic.
Here is a pic of D. anglica "Hawaii" compared with Cindy's. The pic is from Sundew grow guides.
drosera_unknown3_zps3d1e3106.jpg
Drosera_anglica_Kanaele_Bog_clump.JPG
 
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