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Aug 17, 2014
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365
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South Florida
Generally, I don't give Maxsea to Pinguicula, but when I do it's the same pipette dropper that I use for everything else. And seeds are just sown on soil and kept moist; as I've only had one set of seeds actually germinate thus far (where the Mexican species are concerned, and very few sets attempted either) can't say I have info on a "best option" for that.

Gotcha, I just read it on the first page of the thread
Do you feed them otherwise?
That's fine, was just curious, I've been asking around for future reference to see which would be most appropriate

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Joined
Apr 19, 2012
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Greeley, CO, USA
Dried bloodworms at the moment (and then I'll try the fish foods I ended up with for free to see if that works too); which one I use depends both on how big the plants are and how much of a hurry I'm in (Maxsea is faster to apply, spritz and done).
 
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No, it's 'Aphrodite'. Cultivar description has pink-purple flowers and elongate fleshy leaves that blush heavily red/purple in strong lighting.
 
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Oct 30, 2016
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175
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Washington state - 7b
Those are some healthy looking P. primuliflora. I've noticed that you are growing these and your P. caerulea in what looks like live sphagnum. Do you find they do best planted in moss? I don't have any experience with these species (yet), but tend to prefer more inorganic media like I see many of your other pings are growing in.
 
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Warm-temperate Pinguicula are not to be treated like Mexican Pinguicula. They do not grow in mineral soils naturally most of the time and would not appreciate such conditions as are given Mexican species. They are not growing in moss, only have live sphagnum on the surface (I use it more as a monitor of soil conditions for most species, not a growing medium itself); the soil is peat mixed with either sand or perlite depending on what I have available, preferring sand. These are savannah and swamp plants, growing alongside Drosera and Sarracenia.
 
Joined
Apr 24, 2005
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708
Location
LE MANS - FRANCE
Bonjour

have you a picture to your x 'Aphrodite' corolla

x'Aphrodite' = agnata x moctezumae so she inherits leaves of moctezumae and agnata

for all my subtropical US I use blond peat /river sand 30/70 .

on the other hand 2 condition of different culture:

very very wet (even submerged in the spring) for : primuliflora-ionantha-planifolia

just wet for lutea-pumila-caerulea

many people in europe grow this primuliflora only in live Sphagnum.

jeff
 
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There are pictures of every Pinguicula I have ever flowered in this thread, including 'Aphrodite,' which as not bloomed recently, and all photos are labeled. I don't question the identity when comparing it to similarly grown plants by others of the same cultivar. Being a cultivar, the name also does not require being preceded by an "x" hybrid designation.

30/40 does not equal a hundred percent combination if that's what those numbers are referring to; perhaps you mean a 3:4 ratio? Which is still somewhat high on the sand side compared to what I see mot recommended but sand would be a lot closer to a natural element of their soil than perlite or clay, Turface, vermiculite etc. used for Mexican species.
 
Joined
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LE MANS - FRANCE
Bonjour

I know for the X , but to make it clear that it is a hybrid ,for me I always put it .The concept of cultivar (all cultivated plants)is not enough especially for new bie.

I still have a doubt looking at the flower and the shape of the leaves on the nature of your x 'Aphrodite ', but I'm wrong maybe ???

this is a real x 'Aphrodite' we can see here the impression of the parents :
for the corolla https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1582/24249697964_4ef18c0b09_k.jpg
for the leaves http://photobucket.com/gallery/user/zero1978/media/cGF0aDpwaW5nczA4MzAwOC9hcGhyb2RpdGVmb3Jlc3QuanBn/?ref=

excuse me for the % ; I wanted to say 30/70 blond peat/river sand :hail:

jeff
 
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Leaves match (mine just stay smaller normally due to the space they are in), and the flowers are variable and known to change color (start purplish, age to pink), but corolla details of mine otherwise match the description: faint veining in the petals (which I don't see much of in your linked photo), light to bright yellow (typically) corolla tube, and an extension of that color out toward the central lower petal as seen in the majority of 'Aphrodite' flower photos.
 
Joined
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LE MANS - FRANCE
Bonjour

for the leaves, let's admit (although I do not believe that having bushy leaves diminishes their characteristics)

for the corolla ,I am more circumspect .I do not see in your photo ;
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5695/21478474094_1341366e49_z.jpg ; elements reminiscent of agnata and moctezumae
no corolla as long as broad, no shade of darker pink no streaks at the tab of the lobes

are you sure, of your traçability?

to determine a hybrid from his parents is always difficult, so maybe I'm wrong:scratch:

jeff
 
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Joined
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That photo is a bad angle and not highly representative of the actual flower shape; if it's not 'Aphrodite' it's certainly a sister cross, and I'm perfectly happy to have someone with a confirmed 'Aphrodite' send me one to compare. And being bushy doesn't change the leaves, it's the pot size and number of plants currently in the pot.

Moving on...
P. esseriana by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
P. gigantea by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 
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