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Frequently updated Plants/Cutting/Seeds for Postage

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Dec 6, 2014
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337
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San Carlos, CA
I tend to have far too many things that I need to find homes for, so I decided to start a thread which I can add to, as necessary. I'll use the edit function to indicate when an item is no longer available.

In general, I'm trading for postage, which is typically Priority Mail, at the 1 pound or less scale. Sometimes First Class Parcel, which is 2 or 3 dollars less. Also typically less for seeds, and sometimes for cuttings. The idea is to ship things cheaply at cost.

Feel free to offer a trade, although don't be surprised if I reject it. In terms of a trade for something particularly interesting, bear in mind that if I'm offering something for free, chances are I have more of it available.

I'll restrict some items based on location or growing conditions, as I grow a lot of plants that are cool growers, and will die a quick death outside in most of the country.
 
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I figured I should start out with something carnivorous, although most items in this thread will likely be non-carnivores.

A small seedling of Drosera binata and a very young seedling of Myrmecodia tuberosa.

One of the "pot-mates" of this Drosera binata seedling is already blooming--first flower opened today. I suspect, but do not know yet, that this is a self-fertile strain of D. binata, as this is the one available from the ICPS seedbank, I'm told.



Both of these should ship for 1 pound. The Myrmecodia was just moved from a pot with several other seedlings. It was not exactly well anchored in the medium.

Update: these two have homes. although I may have more.
 
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Joined
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Seeds of Passiflora antioquiensis plus ?

At first I was just going to use this to pass on seeds of P. antioquiensis that are hopefully still viable, from July 2013. I added six more that should be viable that were harvested in August 2014. I also included a P. edulis seedling in the picture. If one is interested, I could include that as well, and/or some cuttings and ship for under 1 pound. Or, just the P. antioquiensis seeds, in a padded envelope.

This is one I'll restrict based on location (Coastal CA, Sunset zones 15-17, 24, parts of 22,23) or a track record of growing cool growing plants in a controlled environment elsewhere. People who grow in greenhouses in the Northern States (AHS heat zones 1-3, maybe 4) might also work. I impose those restrictions because P. antioquiensis is really a hard core cool grower. I was told early on that the plant was impossible even in San Jose, CA (average summer temps about 80/55) by the guy who is ultimately responsible for most of the seeds grown in this country. I think it can be done in that climate, with very careful placement, and protection from the cold (dies, permanently, at about 27 F). This is regarded as a shade-loving plant, by the way.



Besides it's cool growing properties, P. antioquiensis is notable as having large (5 inch) flowers that hang down on peduncles up to 2 feet long. It's self-fertile, although not always self-pollinating, and the fruit has a reputation as one of the best tasting in the genus.

Photo below from Bill Harberts, my source of seeds:



Update 6/5: I'm a bit surprised by the lack of interest in this one, as P. antioquiensis is a pretty choice species. A couple years ago, someone sold 6 seeds of this on Ebay for $150 . The seeds were from the same source, even. I decided to start the seeds (they are soaking now). I will contribute a plant or two back to TF as a giveaway, and/or sell a plant and have the proceeds fund postage for Passiflora cuttings and/or plants.
 
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A couple Andean tuber crops: Yacon and Mashua

Yacon is Smallanthus sonchifolius (and a couple synonyms) and gets tall, with big leaves. It produces two types of tubers: small "crown" tubers that can be use to reproduce the plant, and larger storage tubers that are edible. They are best (sweetest) after sitting in the sun for a couple weeks.

Mashua is Tropaeolum tuberosum and produces tubers in the Fall, around the time it blooms. It's related to the common garden Nasturtium and all parts are edible. The flowers are on long peduncles, and are very attractive to hummingbirds. Mashua is a bit of a lover of cool temperatures. It's not clear to me how much this restricts where it is grown.

The Yacon is a piece of a sprouted tuber. The Mashua is a tuber that has been chopped into pieces. I assume the Mashua will exit dormancy and start growing soon, but I don't know this for sure...



Update: These have been taken. In the short term, at least, I will likely have more Mashua, but not Yacon.
 
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Fresh Dragon Fruit seeds. It's probably possible to ship these cheaply (an envelope with some inserted padding, single stamp) and get acceptable losses--even a few intact seeds should produce plants. Or they could be sent in a bubble envelope.

Fruits were $1 at a market in/near Richmond, CA:



I ate some, and also harvested tons of seeds On right are seeds after 6 days on a wet paper towel:



Seeds sprouting further after 9 days:



I could easily send 100+ seeds.
 
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None of the above are claimed, with the partial exception of the Drosera binata of the first item. However, I have more of those, and can pair one with the Myrmecodia if interested.

I'll add a pair of Mexican species: a Fucracaea (Agavaceae) and a Salvia (Lamiaceae).

The Fucraceae has been identified as Fucracaea parmentieri, which bears bulbils (plantlets) on the inflorescence after flowering. The Salvia is Salvia divinorum.

I will not ship these guys to states that prohibit either, or to TF members under 18. The Fucraea is from a dropped bulbil outside the County Fair Building, SF. The Salvia is from a plant I picked up at the Cabrillo College plant sale a couple weekends ago. Both have been potted in 2 inch pots for possible shipping.





Update: These two have a home.
 
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I'm already way behind sending things out, but here's another.

Caudiciforms for a beginner. These are intended for a beginner, whether 13 or 80 years old.

They would ship for a pound ($7.15 or slightly less), and would be sent for postage.



1) Bowiea volubilis ("Climbing Onion") small plantlet from bulb scale propagation.
2) Sinningia tuberosa (fragrant) small shoot with minimal roots.
3) Haemanthus albiflos, small plant from leaf cutting.
4) Dioscorea sylvatica. Year old seedling in active growth.
5) Plectranthus grallatus. Year old seedling
6) Begonia dregei 'Richardsiana'. Rooted cutting. Will make a caudex, although probably not as vigorous as a seedling. Should also make seeds...
7) Myrmecodia tuberosa young seedling
8) Agapetes 'Ludgvan Cross' unrooted cutting. Should be split into several cuttings, and I may do so before sending. Rooted cuttings form a caudex. This plant becomes big, and is basically a cool-grower. Requires cool nights, but is apparently more forgiving of daytime heat when night temperature drops. I've had a cutting root in water, although perlite may be safer.

For scale, the pot in #4 is 2 inches.

Update: Some of these have found homes, but I can replace most or all of those taken. In other words, the offer essentially stands.
 
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"Weeds" from my place and my mom's.

A few of these are truly weeds, a couple shouldn't even be planted in certain parts of the country. A few really shouldn't be called "weeds". Almost everything here is stunningly beautiful.

Everything should ship for a pound, but obviously most things will be need barerooting.



1) Impatiens namchabarwensis (blue flowers)
2) Cuphea ignea white
3) Trachelium caeruleum 'Hamer Pandora'
4) Commelina coelestis, I think (uprooted seedling still rooting). Also an amazing blue color
5) Tinantia pringlei
6) Arbutus unedo. I think. Seedlings grow everywhere, my ID is based on numbers and location. Great tasting fruit from this strain.
7)Impatiens balfourii (can likely be grown from rooted cuttings). An annual that can be a bit aggressive/invasive.
8) Crassula 'Red Pagoda'. Not a weed, but easy to propagate.
9) Crassula alba var. parvisepala
10) Petunia exserta seeds
11) Calceolaria mexicana seeds
12) Berlandiera lyrata seeds, fresh from my mom's plant. Not a weed, was just producing seeds when I walked by. Flowers smell like chocolate.
13) Pinellia ternata or tripartita. If the seeds ripen soon. I don't know which, and I lost the tag. i doubt either is a weed here, but that's not true elsewhere...

The Cuphea had minimal roots when I yanked the "volunteer" out of a pot. If it doesn't make it, I can send a cutting. The Trachelium is a perennial (although it might make viable seeds off the current flowers). When not confined to a tiny pot it's much larger, and very impressive.
 
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Joined
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Although I'm already behind on sending out plants, I'm going to add another, as this is time sensitive.

Dahlia tenuicaulis, sometimes called "Ever blooming Tree Dahlia"). For me it indeed blooms at pretty much any time of the year. This may vary depending on the climate. I suspect this plant is more of a cool grower compared to the more common "tree Dahlia", Dahlia imperialis, but I do not know that for sure.

This plant is unusual as a Dahlia because the flowers are scented. The strength of the scent seems to vary from not noticeable, to pretty clear. I wasn't aware of it until I walked close to my plant and noticed a very pleasant fragrance.

Here's what mature plants look like at the SF Botanical Garden (probably 10 or 15 feet tall).



And here are the cuttings I can send, with a razor blade for scale. I'll keep them in the fridge for a few days, then if they are not claimed, start rooting them. In the past they've been pretty easy to root.



I can send these for postage, which, because they are small and light, would be either a Flat Rate box ($5.95, I think), or a First Class Parcel ($3 or $4--I need to see if I have an appropriate box, and weigh these guys).
 
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These are absolutely free--will be sent in a regular envelope with one stamp.

I'm at my mom's and grabbed a ton of seeds/fluff, etc. from this plant.


I took a photo of the plant this year (it's a lot bigger) but it's somewhere hidden among thousands of photos on my camera. A couple years ago:



So what is it?? Annie's annuals sold it previously as Ageratum corymbosum, then as Eupatorium sordidum, and now again as Ageratum corymbosum. Strangely, the name Eupatorium sordidum is the obsolete name for Bartlettina sordida. Bartlettina sordida gets 10-15 feet tall and is also a truly cool plant.

I think (but do not know for sure) that Kartuz sells the same plant. They say:

http://www.kartuz.com/p/80126/Bartlettina+sp.html

"This strikingly beautiful shrub comes from the cloud forests of Mexico. The large velvety heart-shaped leaves are purplish green with purple veining, dark purple beneath. Young growth and stems are deep maroon-purple with large bluish violet ageratum-like flower clusters in spring. Fast growing to 4 feet high. Needs bright shade and ample water. Can be grown in a cool greenhouse in large pots in the winter (minimum temperature 35F) and then brought outdoors in spring and summer. Give frost protection. USDA zones 9 - 11.

With hundreds of Ageratum, Bartlettina, and Eupatorium species, the proper identification of this plant is uncertain. It is sometimes offered elsewhere as Ageratum corymbosum, but it does not fit the botanical description for A. corymbosum (flat-top whiteweed, desert ageratum). Also, listed by another grower as Ageratum 'Azure Skies'. The typical Bartlettina sordida has greener leaves and is larger growing. Our guess is that this is probably a variety or subspecies of Bartlettina sordida or a closely related species."

I just call it an unnamed Bartlettina species. I don't know exactly what defines that genus, but it certainly looks to me a lot more like Bartlettina sordida than an Ageratum or a Eupatorum.

As Kartuz mentioned, it is a cloud forest species. I assume it likes it cool and essentially frost free, but I have no idea what its limits are.

Anwyay, my mom's plant bloomed beautifully and made a ton of seeds/fluff. I don't know if these are viable. In my only previous attempt I got one seedling. I really don't know as many Asteraceae will make lots of empty seeds. The seeds under magnification look small but "full" in my opinion. I'll hopefully try again, but there's no way I can use this many seeds:



You can't see, but there are tiny black seeds in there. I just managed to get a magnified view:



I'll send a fraction of what's in the bag above (a small ziploc bag). The "fluff" should cushion any danger to the tiny seeds.

I'll also send a few seeds of others I picked up tonight: Petunia exserta and Calceolaria mexicana. Both are tiny enough to elude the USPS rollers that crush seeds.
 
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Neomarica caerulea.



This one is a stunner, and my impression is it's more commonly grown in the Southeastern U.S. than in California. I've seen reports that it can even be grown and bloomed as a houseplant. I got the mother plant from the Huntignton Botanical Gardens a number of years ago. It blooms reliably for my mom; last year it had 15 flowers open on one day. This is unusual because it blooms successively off a flower spike, and individual flowers last a day or less.

After the flowers bloom, the plant produces plantlets on the flower spike. This is NOT what I have here. My mom's plant is going nuts and wants to make 3 times as many small fans for next year. It's in a pot and doesn't have the space to do this, so I removed 3:



Obviously, the fans/plants are basically rooted, but I'll pot them up and can send one to anyone who is interested. We can figure out how to send, and what the postage would be (I thinks it's highly variable depending on how it's sent). I can always add other things.

Update: All of these are taken, by the 3 people who messaged me. I'll get back to them soon.
 
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I took a whole lot of cuttings of 3 plants at my mom's. This is more than I can deal with of each one. If someone is interested in some of these, please contract me soon.

I don't have time to go in depth regarding climate requirements, but all are cool growers, I think (not sure about the Bartlettina).

Agapetes serpens, the plant in bloom:



The cuttings: I will keep many of these:



Bartlettina species in bloom (a couple years ago, when smaller):



Bartlettina cuttings (again, I plan to keep many):



Cantua in bloom (a couple years ago, same plant, different settings):



Cantua cuttings:



Sent for postage. I need to work with these guys immediately, and then I will have a better sense as to what I can send.
 
Joined
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The Agapetes serpens cuttings mentioned above. I'm going to keep the top ones as indicated. I can send out the ones on the bottom to people who want to try these

The leaves, especially those I'm sending often have damage which I'm told is due to thrips.

 
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