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Joined
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Welcome to the forum and nice color on your flytrap! What are the white sticks in the pot with it? Also where are you from?
 
Joined
May 22, 2016
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I live in Michigan. It was actually pretty nicely colored when we got it- was in much better shape than a lot of the rescues I've seen posted.

The white sticks are just confectioners sticks, like for lollipops. We put those in to kind of separate a few traps that were growing together

- - - Updated - - -

This picture was taken the day we got it (Saturday):

http://rs1268.pbsrc.com/albums/jj57...9485_HDR_zpslhxaw2xe.jpg?w=480&h=480&fit=clip
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
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Welcome to the forum. :welcome:

Here's something you might want to know. When your vft flowers and it will, you can cut it off and put it in some media and grow a whole new plant.
 
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When rescue plants have good color, it's because it's new stock. Always good to get them when they're fresh before they suffer in the insufficient lighting of stores.
 
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May 22, 2016
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Its hard to say cause it was a pretty nice nursery- can't be sure how quality its care was but seems like it was better than a big chain store. They handed out leaflets with the "correct" instructions
 

curtisconners

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You just cut off the flower? How mature should the flower be first?

Yes, it's that simple. I have only tried this for the first time this spring, but I cut the stalks when they were about an inch and a half long. I used segments that were about 1/2" long and they're still green.
 
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May 22, 2016
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Thought I had read darn near everything on the topic- but hadn't heard that yet. Thanks for the tip!
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
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You might want to look into a book called the savage garden by Peter D'amato. It covers pretty much everything related to carnivorous plants.
 
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May 22, 2016
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Thanks, I'll look into it. For now I'm pretty sure we have the basics down (water, sun, medium) for this plant but looking into making more sounds great!
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
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You might want to look into other carnivorous plants. Drosera capensis has virtually identical care requirements to a vft, but without a dormancy. Sarracenia purpurea also has similar care requirements, but it needs a dormancy.
 
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From the little bit I've read it sounds like drosera are annual plants- so can I grow them for longer than one season as long as I get an indoor setup or what?
 
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Most Drosera are perennials actually, but most are tropical or subtropical plants and would need to be grown indoors. There are only a handful that are annuals (mainly the D. indica complex, D. sessilifolia, and D. burmannii, though those last two can be convinced to live longer.)
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
Joined
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From the little bit I've read it sounds like drosera are annual plants- so can I grow them for longer than one season as long as I get an indoor setup or what?
Echoing nimbulan, the majority of drosera are perennial. If you don't want to keep them indoors, there are many temperate species that you can stick outside for the winter, such as d. filiformis. Never be closed minded with the abilities of sundews, they live all over the world and are one of the most diverse carnivorous plant groups.
 
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Well in Michigan, winter care for temperate plants can be tricky since it gets far colder than most of them can tolerate, especially when grown in pots. Some people will move plants into unheated rooms or garages for the winter to keep them cold but avoid freezing. Drosera linearis and Sarracenia purpurea ssp. purpurea do grow natively in Michigan, though D. linearis is not common in cultivation as it is considered a more difficult species.
 
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It looks like you have a Sarracenia purpurea (I think ssp. purpurea) there, though being unlabeled it could very well be a hybrid.
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
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It's definitely got purpurea genes in it. Give it care like that of your vft and it should do fine. Good luck with your new addicti.... errrr, hobby.
 
Joined
May 22, 2016
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Thanks for all the help and encouragement! One last question and I'll leave you alone for a bit- some care sheets for sarracenia say to use only LFS for medium and others say to use the peat mix as well- what do you think? I've got enough of both leftover to do either
 
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