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How well does hairy hamata respond to rooting?

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Aug 24, 2002
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I have a 9 year old hairy hamata which while growing fairly well has not pitchered for some time. As it had been in the compost for quite a while and I have been having issues with others plants where I think the compost has outstayed its welcome decided to repot. I carefully unpotted the plant is a bucket of RO water and the compost drifted away leaving the stem and roots intact. I repotted in a fresh mix and returned the plant to its tank. Today I discovered the whole plant was going limp and wrinkled (something I have dreaded might happen for some time!). I have chopped up the vine into two sections and keeping my fingers crossed. Is it one of the more fussy plants to root or not too bad?

Have had a few bad growing periods recently and lost my rajah & eddy this year as well. So the collection is going down... And winter has only just started.
 

NemJones

I Am the Terror Of the Night!
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9 years?

I wish you would have asked repotting questions before you did it.
I only say this because it seems as a general consensus that Red Hairies
are one of the most picky and temperamental Nepenthes you can possibly grow.
Once those plants become established and growing, you should never even move them.

I know a few folks who have moved red hairies just a foot to the left of where they were growing for the past year and it ended up dying.
RH and Villosa seem to be extremely fragile when it comes to root disturbances. I once saw another forum thread where a guy repotted his 10 year old villosa with baseball sized pitchers
only to watch it die very quickly afterwards. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the Red H. may be a gonner too.

IF you are trying to re-root, I wish you the best of luck, as I have no idea what success rate people have gotten from trying.
keep us updated
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
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Southern California
What's the humidity in the tank? I would probably bag the plant if it's not too late. My guess is the roots are stressed from repotting so if the humidity is not high, it may cause the limpness and wrinkles. I have a RHH and a couple of villosas that I have moved all over the place with no issues.
 
Joined
Aug 24, 2002
Messages
385
Location
uk
What's the humidity in the tank? I would probably bag the plant if it's not too late. My guess is the roots are stressed from repotting so if the humidity is not high, it may cause the limpness and wrinkles. I have a RHH and a couple of villosas that I have moved all over the place with no issues.

I have taken two cuttings which are currently rehydrating in water. I will pot them up tomorrow and bag them and keep my fingers crossed! I did have a villosa for 14 years and did very well. Never moved it and one day it just died alas. Never found the cause.. :( Fickle plants Nepenthes!
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2015
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Portland, OR
What's the humidity in the tank? I would probably bag the plant if it's not too late. My guess is the roots are stressed from repotting so if the humidity is not high, it may cause the limpness and wrinkles. I have a RHH and a couple of villosas that I have moved all over the place with no issues.

How old are they? I often read reports of sudden collapses of plants reaching the decade mark. It seems that as Nepenthes get to be of that age, they are very weak. I wonder if it is less a natural condition of the plant, or if there is something about having them in cultivation that they lack, causing them to become weak adults.
 
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Considering plants in the wild tend to live multiple decades, and many species exceed a century or more, and many of the same species live for nearly or just as long in cultivation, I'd conclude that if you're finding plants regularly declining at that particular age it's probably just your conditions or soil (repotting or moving a plant aside) that need tweaking; this is the first time I've heard anything about a decade mark. I've had plants going for a very long time, and even species that are known for being finicky like rajah etc. I know several people who have kept them for at least a decade, if not more, without any issue (Jeremiah Harris, anyone?).
 

NemJones

I Am the Terror Of the Night!
Joined
Jun 28, 2014
Messages
836
Location
Zone 5
Considering plants in the wild tend to live multiple decades, and many species exceed a century or more, and many of the same species live for nearly or just as long in cultivation, I'd conclude that if you're finding plants regularly declining at that particular age it's probably just your conditions or soil (repotting or moving a plant aside) that need tweaking; this is the first time I've heard anything about a decade mark. I've had plants going for a very long time, and even species that are known for being finicky like rajah etc. I know several people who have kept them for at least a decade, if not more, without any issue (Jeremiah Harris, anyone?).

I agree with this.
I also think that once nepenthes reach a certain
size/age, they generally do not want to be moved, touched or
even repotted. They seem to just want to be left alone.

Possibly 10 years is just a milestone in growing for nepenthes, or its just a strange occurence/curse.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2015
Messages
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Location
Portland, OR
Considering plants in the wild tend to live multiple decades, and many species exceed a century or more, and many of the same species live for nearly or just as long in cultivation, I'd conclude that if you're finding plants regularly declining at that particular age it's probably just your conditions or soil (repotting or moving a plant aside) that need tweaking; this is the first time I've heard anything about a decade mark. I've had plants going for a very long time, and even species that are known for being finicky like rajah etc. I know several people who have kept them for at least a decade, if not more, without any issue (Jeremiah Harris, anyone?).

Maybe I'm only remembering the (unfortunately) more intriguing stories of failure than successes. I do not know how long Jeremiah has been growing, so I didn't really consider him (though perhaps I shoud have considering the size of his rajah). I guess Nem might be right about them not wanting to be moved. I recall a spectacular looking cultivated rajah Jeremiah took a picture with that was at least 5 feet in diameter, that was planted in-ground, so it would have plenty of root space and could not be moved.
 
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