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Is this sun, wind, or temp burn?

Joined
Nov 23, 2014
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132
Location
Chicago, IL
I put my VFT - B52 directly outside a few weeks ago. They get direct east morning sun till high noon. A few days after They started to develop this dark, wilty tissue damage. My initial though was sunburn, but it was also fairly cold (mid 40's), and very windy on my third floor balcony. If it is sun or cold burn, I know it will adjust over time, but my main concern is wind. They've been out for 3-4 weeks and the new traps seem to be doing fine, and look at that color! Is there anything I should be worried about, or is this typical of sunburn?

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Joined
Dec 25, 2014
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New Jersey, US
I concur with the above statement, flytraps normally go into dormancy with anything prolonged under 50F. To be blunt, it is impossible to sunburn a flytap on an east window (or really any window, for that matter) without the help of some really impressive artificial lights.
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
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Chicago, IL
Hm, well they are outside in direct sun, no window.

Temps are warming up and should be in 70's this weekend. If they are doing a dormancy thing, is that detrimental to their heath, or will they be fine when temps are consistently warm?
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2014
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South Florida
I don't see that as being dormancy since the newer leafs are longer, it definitely had some sunburn but as long as the new growth is looking good, it'll do fine (though I would watch out for the wind). Dormancy in flytraps is less from temperatures and more from light levels, mine went dormant in consistently 80° weather
 
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Joined
Aug 22, 2007
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Ashland, OR
Just to clear something up, cold temperatures will not cause flytraps to go dormant, nor will warm weather cause them to break dormancy. The onset of dormancy requires the days to be getting shorter; temperature is secondary. We've had lots of flytraps outside on the deck since mid February and they have experienced temperatures at or below freezing a few times and the warmest nights we've had have only been in the low to mid 40s. They're all putting up flower stalks and new growth as they break dormancy because the days are getting so long now.

AnIsleAteHer - your plants look very healthy. They've got a bit of a "sun tan" going on right now from exposure to direct sunlight that they weren't sufficiently hardened to. But all new growth will be hardened and they should grow well for you in the conditions you describe. Enjoy them!
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
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Boston, MA
I agree, these plants are not going dormant. What you're seeing is shock from a sudden change in conditions. The new leaves and traps will be just fine.
 

Not a Number

Hello, I must be going...
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Joined
Nov 16, 2006
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Right, the current consensus among growers on the ICPS listserv is that season cues in day length (photoperiod) is the primary determining factor on dormancy in Dionaea.

If the plants were raised in artificial conditions or there is a significant change in the latitude between relocations it may take them a growing season or two to get into synchrony with the local conditions.
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
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Location
Chicago, IL
Appreciate the info guys, I figured it was just some shock from their new environment, but I wanted to get some other opinions as I am fairly new to dionaea.
 
Joined
Oct 15, 2010
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164
Location
Birmingham UK
Another underestimated and possible cause, as well as the sun is indeed as you suggest, the wind. If the plants have been indoors the roots are not used to the additional transpiration from the leaves caused by the wind and physically cannot transport enough water to the leaves to cope with it till they have grown a bit. This effectively dehydrates the leaves and can look like burn wilt.

Cheers
steve
 
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