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Looking for either really toothy or tubby nepenthes for beginner

Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
79
Location
Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, United States
Me and my friend were planning on building a greenhouse together and he came up as a nepenthes guy that likes either really toothy or tubby nepenthes and when i say really, i mean hamata toothy or ampullaria tubby and we are both 14 he is inexperienced but i have surprisingly carried my plants through mealy bugs because of contamination from an untrustworthy nursery. Anyway i have had my eye on the predatory plants hamata x ampullaria and was wondering the conditions it needs to survive because ampullaria is typically an ultra lowlander and hamata is a highlander so would it need intermediate or lowland conditions to survive and does anyone have any idea of tubby or toothy nepenthes for beginners
 
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
10
Location
Oakland, CA | USA
I would say the tubby nepenthes for beginner would be Nepenthes "Suki" which also grows brownish black. It is a hybrid between Nepenthes Rafflesiana and what I believe Nepenthes Sibuyensis (Don't Know how to spell it)
 
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
1,897
For the beginner, any hybrid with talangensis or sibuyanensis in it is a good choice for a tubby nepenthes.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,916
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
N. talangensis is a rather picky species, so vigor is more likely to come from other species; if the cross is with something tubby and easy to care for they'll be fine (talangensis x veitchii, ventricosa x talangensis, talangensis x maxima etc.).
Many N. ventricosa forms themselves are rather fat and save for things like the porcelain forms are good beginner plants; sibuyanensis is a little pickier but does lend its size well to basically all its hybrids (and there are a lot of easy ones out there). Truly toothy plants that are beginner-range both in ease and price are very, very rare; those that are easy (the "robmata" that's been out for a couple years now is likely one, burkei x hamata another) tend to be expensive, those that have truly serious teeth (the pure species or toothy x toothy hybrids are the only ones that actually have teeth like hamata itself) are not generally beginner plants. N. singalana is an exception if you can provide proper highland conditions, but not all forms have the truly standout teeth.
 
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