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I set up a simple table with most all Nepenthes species broken into the five common categories; ultra-lowland, lowland, intermediate, highland, and ultra-highland. I have based the placement on altitudinal distribution mostly. I also have temperature range at the top of each category.

Maybe someone will find this helpful. Let me know if you have any edits or see mistakes.

Code:
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<body>
<table width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
  <tr>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#FFCACA"><h3>ULTRA LOWLAND</h3>
    <h4>0 - 500 m<br />
      Day: 85-95° / Night: 70-75° F<br>
      Day: 29-35° / Night: 21-24° C<br />
    </h4></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#FFD3B7"><h3>LOWLAND</h3>
    <h4>500 - 1000 m<br />
    Day: 80-90° / Night: 65-70° F<br>
    Day: 27-32 / Night: 18-21° C</h4></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#FFFFB0"><h3>INTERMEDIATE</h3>
    <h4>1000 - 1500 m<br />
      Day: 75-85° / Night: 55-65° F<br>
      Day: 24-29° / Night: 13-18° C<br>
    </h4></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#CACAFF"><h3>HIGHLAND</h3>
    <h4>1500 - 2000 m<br />
    Day: 70-80° / Night: 50-60° F<br>
    Day: 21-27°  / Night: 10-16° C<br>
    </h4></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#B3FFB3"><h3>ULTRA HIGHLAND</h3>
    <h4>2000 m +<br />
    Day: 65-75° / Night: 45-55° F<br>
    Day: 18-24° / Night: 7-13° C</h4></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#FFCACA"> <p><em>Nepenthes andamana</em> (0-50 m)<br />
        <em>Nepenthes bellii </em>(0-800 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes bicalcarata</em> (0-950 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes campanulata </em>(300-500 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes chang </em>( 300-600 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes danseri</em> (0-320 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes distillatoria</em>(0-700 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes insignis </em>(0-850 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes kampotiana </em>(0-350 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes kerrii </em>(400-500 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes kongkandana</em>(0-50 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes madagascariensis</em> (0-500 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes masoalensis</em> (0-400 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes northiana </em>(0-500 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes philippinensis </em>(0-600 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes rowanae</em> (0-80 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes sumatrana</em> (0-800 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes suratensis </em>(0-50 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes tenax</em> (0-80 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes thorelii</em> (0-200 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes tomoriana </em>(0-500 m)<br />
       <em>Nepenthes treubiana</em> (0-80 m)<br />
    <em>Nepenthes vieillardii</em> (0-850 m)</p></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#FFD3B7"> <p><em>Nepenthes adnata </em>(600-1200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes alata </em>(0-1900 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes albomarginata </em>(0-1200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes ampullaria </em>(0-2100 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes bokorensis </em>(800-1080 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes beccariana </em>(unknown)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes benstonei </em>(450-600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes clipeata </em>(600-800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes eustachya </em>(0-1600)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes faizaliana </em>(400-1600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes gracilis </em>(0-1700 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes hirsuta </em>(200-1100 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes hispida </em>(100-800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes holdenii </em>( 600-800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes khasiana </em>(500-1500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes longifolia </em>(300-1100 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes macrovulgaris </em>(300-1200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes mapuluensis </em>(700-800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes merrilliana </em>(0-900 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes mirabilis </em>(0-1500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes neoguineensis </em>(0-1400 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes papuana </em>(0-1300 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes peltata </em>(865-1635 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes pervillei </em>(350-750 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes rafflesiana </em>(0-1500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes smilesii </em>(0]-1500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes surigaoensis </em>(800-1200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes thai </em>(500-600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes truncata </em>(0-1500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes veitchii </em>(0-1600 m)<br />
    </p></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#FFFFB0"> <p><em>Nepenthes burbidgeae </em>(1200-1800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes burkei </em>(1100-2000 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes chaniana </em>(1100-1800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes copelandii </em>(1400-1600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes deaniana </em>(1180-1296 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes eymae </em>(1000-2000 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes fusca </em>(300-2500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes glandulifera </em>(1100-1700 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes hamiguitanensis </em>(1200-1600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes junghuhnii </em>(1220 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes klossii </em>(1000-2000 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes maxima Reinw. </em>(40-2600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes micramphora </em>(1100-1635 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes mindanaoensis </em>(0-1400 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes mollis </em>(1800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes palawanensis </em>(1100-1236 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes paniculata </em>(~1460 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes petiolata </em>(1450-1900)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes pilosa </em>(1600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes pitopangii </em>(1800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes platychila </em>(900-1400 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes ramispina </em>(900-2000 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes reinwardtiana </em>(0-2200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes rigidifolia </em>(1000-1600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes sanguinea </em>(300-1800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes sibuyanensis </em>(1250-1500 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes stenophylla </em>(800-2600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes tentaculata </em>(400-2550 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes tenuis </em>(1000-1200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes tobaica </em>(380-1800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes ventricosa </em>(1000-2000 m)<br />
    <em>Nepenthes vogelii </em>(1000-1500 m) </p></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#CACAFF"> <p><em>Nepenthes alba </em>(1600-2187 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes argentii </em>(1400-1900 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes attenboroughii </em>(1600-1726 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes bongso </em>(1000-2700 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes ephippiata </em>(1300-2000 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes flava </em>(1800-2200 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes gantungensis </em>(1600-1784 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes glabrata </em>(1600-2100 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes gracillima </em>(1600-1700 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes gymnamphora </em>(600-2800 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes hamata </em>(1400-2500 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes hurrelliana </em>(1300-2400 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes izumiae </em>(1700-1900 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes jacquelineae </em>(1700-2200 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes jamban </em>(1800-2100 m)<br>
<em>Nepenthes leonardoi </em>(N/A)<br />
<em>Nepenthes lingulata </em>(1700-2100 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes lowii </em>(1650-2600 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes macfarlanei </em>(900-2150 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes mantalingajanensis </em>(1700-2085 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes mira </em>(1550-1605 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes muluensis </em>(1700-2400 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes naga </em>(1500-2000 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes ovata </em>(1700-2100 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes rajah </em>(1500-2650 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes rhombicaulis </em>(1600-2000 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes saranganiensis </em>(1800-2100 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes spathulata </em>(1100-2900 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes spectabilis </em>(1400-2200 m)<br />
<em>Nepenthes talangensis </em>(1800-2500 m) </p></td>
    <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor="#B3FFB3"> <p><em>Nepenthes angasanensis </em>(2200-2800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes densiflora </em>(1700-3200 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes diatas </em>(2400-2900 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes dubia </em>(1600-2700 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes edwardsiana </em>(1600-2700)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes inermis </em>(1500-2600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes lamii </em>(1460-3520 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes lavicola </em>(2000-2600 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes macrophylla </em>(2200-2642 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes mikei </em>(1100-2800 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes murudensis </em>(2000-2423 m)<br />
      <em>Nepenthes singalana </em>(2000-2900 m)<br />
    <em>Nepenthes villosa </em>(1600-3240 m) </p></td>
  </tr>
</table>
</body>

Hopefully this is somewhat user-friendly. I have never tried pasting code into this forum.
 

Exo

Tastes like chicken!
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Interesting.....I never considered an "ultra lowland" catagory before......:scratch:

BTW...shouldn't N.ampullaria be considered ultra lowland?.....I mean, it has a wide range, but it is found at 0m.
 
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I was like.. Hey, what about HL and UHL.. then I saw it. SCROLL BAR MORON!! :lol:
Fantastic chart. Definitely a new desktop quick link.
 
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@Exo I dont think ampullaria should be in the ultra-lowland. It range spans from 0 meters up to 2100 meters. My thought is that ampullaria is probably most heavily distributed in lowland ranges so I kinda just took the mean of the distribution.

I am interested on other feedback to fine tune this chart.
 
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Nice!
Andrew or one of the other Mods with their god-like powers should make this into a sticky.


BTW: Don't forget N. aristolochioides and N. boschiana ! :)
 
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I agree with the categorization of N. ampullaria as a lowlander, since its upper range -- 2100 meters -- is almost 7000 feet . . .
 

seedjar

Let's positive thinking!
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Nice one Michael. I'm kind of surprised no one has made an "attitude" joke yet... but then, I can't come up with one either, so I guess it's not exactly a low-hanging fruit.
~Joe
 

vraev

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Great resource Mr Smith. :D Yeah...I was interested in why you chose burbidgeae as an intermediate. Based on what I have read, burbidgeae grows sympatrically with N. rajah on Mt. Kinabalu. But I guess we don't know if this is the extreme end of its range and where the majority of the populations lies at.
 

amphirion

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i agree with vraev: what would probably be very helpful is finding the mean distribution of each species...yeah, certain species are found at ### to ### ft. but where are the majority hanging out? that would be very useful.
 
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i agree with vraev: what would probably be very helpful is finding the mean distribution of each species...yeah, certain species are found at ### to ### ft. but where are the majority hanging out? that would be very useful.

There is another chart but I can't remember where I saw it which shows altitudinal ranges in the form of a bar graph. I'll see if I can find it.
 

vraev

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Is it a bar graph with a mean population count? That would be mighty useful to understand the optimal temperatures for the pickier species. I am also perplexed by inclusion of tenuis, pitopangii and klossii in that range. Well...I guess we have a new project for someone who can visit these places. ;)
 
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Is it a bar graph with a mean population count? That would be mighty useful to understand the optimal temperatures for the pickier species. I am also perplexed by inclusion of tenuis, pitopangii and klossii in that range. Well...I guess we have a new project for someone who can visit these places. ;)

No, it does not specify distribution - though one would imagine that like any statistical bell curve, the majority of those specimens probably lies somewhere in the middle. I know that's a big leap of faith on my part, but all other things being equal (which is probably unlikely), one would expect it to be true.
 
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I did forget aristo and bosh. Let me know if there are others. I updated the chart:
http://www.michaelkevinsmith.com/ne...titudinal-Distribution-Temperature-Chart.html

How many think burbidgeae should be moved up to the highland category based on the criteria that would categorize it as such? I am still thinking intermediate, I have witnessed a crop burbidgeae seedlings grown in highland temps and intermediate. Intermediate outperformed highland over the course of several years. Also, it could be that the mean of burdbidgea populations are found in the 1600-1800 range right along side rajah.

@vraev ... by perplexed do you mean that pitopangi, tenuis, and klossi would not grown in the optimal temps of Day: 75-85° / Night: 55-65° F. I think that temp range would be perfect for these species. No?




Here is the other chart you guys are looking for:
http://www.terraforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=120181
 
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