What's new

Nepenthes Nighttime temp. drop

Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
60
I recently obtained a Nepenthes spathulata x ovata and have seen many opinions of growing nepenthes in general indoors. Some people say that they do very well indoors and adapt to the lower humidity and can also adapt to little to no nighttime temp drop. Is this true? My house is almost always a constant 70-75F with around 50-60 percent humidity. It would be awesome if i could grow my nepenthes indoors successfully but i really don't want to harm it at all. I live in the Northwest so i think growing my plant outside wouldn't be the best because nighttime can often get to cold. At the moment I have a small greenhouse with no temperature moderators and I move it out there sometimes and bring it in to the house into one of our colder rooms at night. What do you guys do when and if you grow you highlanders indoors? do you actually let the the temperature go down or do you usually have a small room that you do it in etc? Any help will be appreciated and i apologize if this subject about no temp. drop has been covered before.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
3,940
I recently obtained a Nepenthes spathulata x ovata and have seen many opinions of growing nepenthes in general indoors. Some people say that they do very well indoors and adapt to the lower humidity and can also adapt to little to no nighttime temp drop. Is this true?

No. Your stated humidity levels are within tolerance, but this genus will gradually suffer from a metabolic disorientation if there is no significant night-to-day temperature differential of at least 15 degrees Fahrenheit. The metabolic disruption will manifest itself as a decrease in pitcher production and the gradual distortion of new foliage and the growing tip may eventually die. There are several distortion effects the plants can display once their metabolism is disrupted and once they do, it can be too late to save the plant. (It can take many months or years for the plant to regain its health if severely affected)

You need to engineer a climate appropriate for these rainforest plants that includes night temps consistently below 60F and above 70F in the day, minimum. A temperature range of 55F at night and 75F to 84F in the day is considered optimal. You should aim for that as best you can. This means having to find a way to affect these temperature swings. Highland type Nepenthes will not grow normally for long with a constant 70-75F climate.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
495
Location
New Jersey, US
I grow the hybrid that you speak of, and I've found it to be a pretty tolerant plant. However, as stated by Whimgrinder, the plant will suffer long-term if the night temperature is not dropped. (Ideally, humidity should also increase at night, but this seems to be a vital requirement only for the really picky species.) Your day temps are good, and if you can get night temps to around 60F, you should be solid. Below 60F is ideal for this plant but not entirely necessary unless you really want to nitpick the details. N. spathulata hybrids are virtually indestructible. I'd like to mention though, it would be best if you could avoid moving the plant around on a nightly basis to get the temperature drop, most Nepenthes are sensitive to even minute environmental changes and slow down growth considerably when disturbed.
 

Dexenthes

Aristoloingulamata
Joined
Dec 6, 2008
Messages
3,741
Location
Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
I can't speak for this particular hybrid, but many hybrid Nepenthes can trudge along with little to no significant night time drop, however they will generally not be as large and impressive as if they were grown in higher humidity and had substantial temperature swings. This is especially true if a hybrid contains N. ventricosa, N. maxima, or N. sanguinea genes. Or if a plant has both highland and lowland heritage, it will generally be less picky about temps than its parents would be. Also, the more complex the hybrid is, the hardier it may be. I would recommend just trying to grow the plant in doors and see what happens, if you notice that it starts to really suffer than you can create a highland environment for it.

I grow my highlanders indoors under lights and the way I achieve the night-time drop is by closing off my room and turning off the heater every night, it will generally get pretty chilly in the room, so I sleep with extra blankets. If you have a girlfriend or wife, that technique may not fly too well. . .
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
60
would you guys think that 45-50 at night would be ok for this hybrid? Since i can keep our small greenhouse in that temperature range fairly easily.
 

Ngantnier

Formerly pond boy
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Messages
437
Location
Onawa, IA
Might be a tad south of ideal temps,but should be fine. I'd aim for more like 50-60 probably.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
3,940
would you guys think that 45-50 at night would be ok for this hybrid? Since i can keep our small greenhouse in that temperature range fairly easily.

50F is often the winter low in my greenhouse, but I aim to never allow temps to drop below 48F. I would think a few nights here and there as low as 45F would be tolerated (but not preferred by most species) as long as 45F is not something they experience every night for weeks on end. IE: avoid temps below 48F as much as possible.
 
Top