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Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,464
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,464
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
New arrival from the auction already settling in well
D. admirabilis "Floating" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Not a new arrival by any stretch...
D. natalensis "typical" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. venusta "typical" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. venusta AF by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
At least one of these is doing fairly well
D. arcturi by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. spatulata "white flower" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Another new arrival already dewing up
D. hamiltonii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
The first of many rotund flowers caught open...also the first to be crossed with. Unfortunately a simultaneous bloom with filiformis is still avoiding me, but tomorrow might be another shot...
D. rotundifolia "Nieuwkoop, Netherlands" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. 'Dork's Pink' by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. roseana by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. helodes "red" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. pedicellaris x callistos by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. pygmaea "green" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. scorpioides "Pink Flower" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
D. scorpioides "Pink Flower" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,464
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,464
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Yes, neat and unique. But sadly too tall for my indoor lighting setup.



The two are interfertile, so why split? Don Schnell gives more reasoning for calling the two varieties in his book.

All Nepenthes are interfertile, as is everything in the petiolaris complex, all Sarracenia, all Heliamphora, many orchids across genera are interfertile, jumping to my other hobby North American rat snakes and king/milk snakes (entirely separate genera with multiple species and have been for at least a few million years) are interfertile and both with gopher snakes too, nearly all pythons are interfertile across multiple genera, yet no one in their right mind would ever call each group just one singular species. The claim of fertility being the deciding factor on species separation is invalid and hasn't been used as a reliable singular factor in defining taxa for a long time, at best only an extra bit of evidence of lengthened separation; the two species here (they are not at all varieties, or even subspecies) are separated by differing sizes, colorations, structure of the tentacles, growth habits, reduced fertility in the hybrids (which does actually play against the "interfertile" claim), stipule structure, range and some ecological factors...all traits that would have seen them immediately separated if they were more similar to most sundews than they are. The only thing really joining them is that they're both North American and have filiform leaves, same situation basically as the case with D. graomogolensis and spiralis in Brazil yet I almost never hear anyone arguing that they're just one taxon.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2015
Messages
113
Location
Southern California
Rat Snakes; fascinating. Schnell’s book gives some really excellent info on the two varieties. If you think you know something he may have missed, please tell us. Especially neat, Schnell predicted an all green form of var. filiformis might be discovered which would set to rest species tracyi. This has come to pass. Anyway, I suppose the bottom line here is that tracyi has not been officially described as a species.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,464
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
D. tracyi was described as a species before it was described as a variant of filiformis (early 1900's, Macfarlane), ergo there's nothing missing to accept it as such. Anthocyanin-free forms of both species are known as are now more than one unique flower color variants and of course the locality-separate variation of filiformis in Florida which is the only place the two taxa interact (and much as with most Sarracenia gene flow between the two is fairly low, signifying reproductive barriers of some form), signaling there's been time enough for filiformis alone to diverge significantly within its own populations but yet still retains enough shared traits across them all to remain cohesive, and that are different from those of tracyi to tell they've been separate taxa for a very significant amount of time.
 
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