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Recommendation for beginners CP's

Joined
Nov 28, 2020
Messages
2
Location
London
Hey there

I'm a newbie when it comes to CP's I grow all sorts outdoor and have a nice collection of house plants including succulents. My first plant is a Venus Fly Trap (Dionaea muscipula) and I have the bug...:beguiled:

So I would be really grateful if any of you guys could point me in the direction of some really unusual and fun varieties I should look into, but plants that I'm likely yo get some early success with while i learn more about carnivorous plants in general

Any guidance from your own experience that will help me get a few accessible and fun plants would be much appreciated, thanks
 
Joined
Aug 31, 2020
Messages
27
Lots of people will recommend D. capensis, which might be ok. I killed my first, so it is possible to have issues with it. I'd look to see if there are any Drosera native to your area and try to grow outdoors to avoid sinking funds into an indoor setup while you're still getting the hang of it.

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thez_yo

instigator
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
Messages
5,438
Location
Virginia, USA
I suggest some relatively cheap intermediate Nepenthes and grow them as houseplants by an East facing window or get a growlight for it. If it grows and pitchers, you're ready for more.
 

bluemax

Lotsa blue
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Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
2,573
Location
Vancouver, Washington State, US
If you are having success growing venus' flytraps out of doors you might want to try Drosera rotundifolia, D. filiformis and from the butterworts, Pinguicula grandiflora. All should be compatible with your climate there in London. They should be fairly easily available as well.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2020
Messages
19
Drosera capensis, as was mentioned before, is a great beginner plant. Drosera spatulata as well, if you want a smaller rosetted sundew. Very hearty plants.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,487
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Note that the majority of things called "Drosera spatulata" in cultivation right now are D. tokaiensis. Both are easy species (or at least some variants of spatulata are), but tokaiensis is more likely to be encountered.
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2011
Messages
182
Location
Bloomingdale, NJ
I assume it is London, England? What is your winter low temperature? Frosts? Snow? How much sun do you get? How much rain? Do you have access to very low mineral content water like DI or RO? How much space are you planning on dedicating to CP?

I limit my plants to those I can grow outdoors and can overwinter buried in a huge pile of leaves covered with plastic to keep the leaves dry. I can see 0F for a few days in a row. Might get up to the mid teens during the day in those periods.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2020
Messages
19
Oooh. Now you have me wondering whether I really have spatulata. I bought from a local nursery, so it could go either way. Gotta take a closer look at the leaves.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 26, 2020
Messages
19
Unless it was labeled as the "Fraser Island" form, from a local nursery it's almost certainly tokaiensis.
I'm not home to do an immediate direct comparison, but looking at the photos online, I think you're right. Lol

These were among the first plants I bought. I thought I had spatulata for over 2 years now. Lol
 
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