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JennB

You are getting sleeeepy...very, very sleeeeepy...
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
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Lampasas, TX
While I agree that the teacher DEFINITELY shouldn't be passing on misinformation, you do have to consider the fact that the school in question apparently teaches creationism. Supplying facts doesn't seem to be a top priority in general.

:headwall::headwall:GAAAH!! Don't even get me started on this serious, and growing, breach in the war for keeping religion and gov't seperate!:headwall::headwall:
 

Est

War. War never changes.
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haha thread CLOSED!


(just kidding, guys)

*chuckle* I'm just one mod of many, but it looks like everybody's being respectful. :)

As for the original post, it seems like one of those cases where if interpret "what the teacher meant" liberally enough that it could be correct. Both as previously mentioned, over evolutionary timescales, or in cases where the nutrients can be supplied via a non-damaging method, we do see (or would expect to see) a reduction in investment in carnivory. So the point is relatively correct; carnivory exists to supply nutrition via an alternative method and will reduce in the absence of that pressure.

Ask your teacher if a cactus will grow like a "normal plant" if you grow it in water. ;)
 
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Cernunnos Woods
Only mention of fossils and CPs I've seen is in Flora Malesiana Vol. 15 (Nepenthacae) which states that there were pollen grains found in the fossil record that resembled Drosera pollen but the fossilized pollen was 10 times larger than modern day Drosera pollen grains. It's fun to imagine CPs 10x larger than they are today, although the plants probably wouldn't have the same morphology as they do today. Nobody knows what they would look like since pollen is all that's been found preserved so far.
 

TheFury

Oh, the humanity!!
Joined
Oct 3, 2010
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Brooklyn, NY
It absolutely amazes me that paleontologists can dig up a rock that formed tens of millions of years ago and extract miniscule grains of pollen, and identify them reliably! *head explodes*
 

TheFury

Oh, the humanity!!
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Wow! A. longicervia eh? I think I saw a nice looking Archaeamphora clone on eBay the other day. I hear their preferred media is 1 part sand to 1 part Brachiosaurus dung :-))
 
Joined
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can we have the isbn of that book please? Im very curious.

978-1-932012-54-5

---------- Post added at 06:50 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:41 PM ----------

By the way the textbook on what is has to say about Carnivorous plants, is all true. Just read it.
 

TheFury

Oh, the humanity!!
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"Students who take and understand this course will be very well-prepared for a tough university biology course."

:headwall:
 
Joined
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https://apologia.securesites.net/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=4&products_id=6
One chapter from it.. "MODULE #9: Evolution: Part Scientific Theory, Part Unconfirmed Hypothesis" :-))
The publisher: https://apologia.securesites.net/

That was a good module. Good logical facts haha.

---------- Post added at 11:27 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:23 PM ----------

"Students who take and understand this course will be very well-prepared for a tough university biology course."

:headwall:

True! But she gives us sheets of things that we would see and learn in a college class.
 

jimscott

Tropical Fish Enthusiast
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Maybe she means in evolutionary terms.... in which case she is probably right.
(but doesn't sound that way)

me dunno

Getting from point A to point C and surviving point B that's tough. Point B has a lot of sub-point B's, over a long period of time.

Finding genetic changes behind moths' coloration


In a famous example of natural selection, English moths began turning black as soot darkened their trees. Now scientists are closing in on the DNA fingerprint behind the shift.
April 16, 2011|By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times

During the Industrial Revolution in 19th century England, black moths started appearing — because they blended in better on pollution-darkened tree trunks than did normal, speckled moths. Now scientists are closing in on the genetic change responsible for that classic example of natural selection.

The peppered moth is a black-and-white-spattered moth that clings to trees in the daytime. In 1800s England, dark soot from the factories began to coat trees once covered with pale lichen. That was when the black-bodied version began showing up in the population — and some 1950s experiments showed why: In polluted areas, birds devoured the light, speckled moths in greater numbers than the black ones, because they were easier to see. (In clean areas, the opposite held true: Birds ate more of the dark moths.)

Ilik Saccheri, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Liverpool, and colleagues decided to use modern molecular tools to figure out what DNA changes caused the shift.

To do so, the researchers conducted extensive moth breeding and scoured the insects' genomes for little genetic variations that always showed up when the bodies were black. They traced the mutation to a DNA region in a particular place on one of the moth chromosomes, which implied that the gene causing the black color must lie in that region.

The scientists were also interested in knowing whether black moths had arisen many times independently during the period of pollution. To study that, they sampled black moths found in 80 different locations in the United Kingdom. In all cases, they found the same DNA fingerprint — suggesting that the mutation for black coloration came from one original moth.

The scientists still don't know precisely what gene caused the blackness, however — Saccheri said that would take further study.

"This is only the beginning, really," he said.

The team also noted that the chromosome region in which the gene lies is known, in many species of butterflies, to influence the patterns on wings. This chromosome segment may have been of great importance in driving shape and color changes during moth and butterfly evolution, said Robert Reed, a UC Irvine evolutionary geneticist who was not involved in the study.

The study was published in the journal Science.
 
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