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U Volubillis

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Nov 1, 2021
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I just received a bunch of U. Volubillis seeds. Germination instructions came with them and it is similar to sprouting Advalanda except a little less water and covering them with plastic film. As for growing them I am a bit confused. I have seen pictures of it in water and it growing free. I have read that it is in soil and that it likes to grow with sedges, and likes to climb up to 3 feet tall. I am considering putting a plant that it can climb or plastic poles / trellis. How do you guys grow this?

This is my pond. currently it gets about 35 minutes of full sun a day and will have 8 to 10 hrs later in the year. I have just started work after a prolong time. I have been worrying that I was not giving it enough light. A lot of my plants have died back possibly or are still in dormancy. This was my first week at work and I have not payed much attention to the pond. While taking these pictures I noticed that both of my Sarracenia have NEW LEAVES! Yay!!!! Something besides the Capensis has survived!

 

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bluemax

Lotsa blue
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Vancouver, Washington State, US
I am currently growing U. beaugleholei from seed and being as it seems to be a close relative to U. volubilis I am interested. So far I have a small plant with 3 leaves that is being grown underwater and rooted into a sandy medium at the bottom. The instructions that I was given were to sprout the seeds on very moist substrate and then submerge them under 2" of water after sprouting. This seems to be working.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2021
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80
The only instructions I got are:
Sow seed directly on the surface of your moist but not soaked soil mix.

Do not cover them with any medium.

cover the top of pot with clear plastic so the humidity will remain high. Place them in an area with nice strong light and keep the temp around 25c / 76f.

When you see some tiny plants starting to sprout, slowly open the top of the pot, a little each day, so that the new seedlings don't go into shock from the humidity being lowered too quickly.

No instructions for after sprouting. LOL.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2021
Messages
80
Ok I have an answer!

Utricularia Volubilis

Utricularia volubilis is a wonderful annual plant. This submerged aquatic species from Southwestern Australia represents a botanical rarity.

It bears large violet flowers on twining scapes to 90 cm.

Its filamentous leaves can be up to 30 cm long and its pigmented traps up to 5 mm large.

The large traps can be seen on short stalks attached to the rosette.

Traps are often held on the tips of some of the grass like leaves.

Both of these types of traps are suspended in the water.

The largest traps of all are attached to the underground stolons and trap preys which live in this substrate. The bladder-trap is unique to the Utricularia, giving them their nickname of Bladderwort.

Utricularia has no true root system. They form creeping or floating, thin, hair-like stems that extended away from the main body of the plant. The bladder-traps are held on these stems.

The traps are underground and are too small to hand feed. So, it has to catch it's own microscopic prey. Thin, filament-like hairs protrude from the trap door.

These serve as guides to send the prey toward the door. These plants use low pressure inside the chamber vs. high pressure outside.

When a bug activates the hairs, the door opens quickly, forcing the victim into the low-pressure digestion area. The water is pumped out and the mulcilage seal is re-established.

The plant now secrets digestive juices to break down the captured prey and absorb the mineral rich fluid. Trapping usually occurs within 1/50 of a second.

It is believed that glands found around the closed entry may also secrete an attractant that may aid in luring prey.

Hardiness zone 11, (4°C/40°F) in Winter. Optimum temperatures are 18-26 °C, it can tolerate 5 °C. The species prefers slight shading. In captivity, they grow well in a standard 1:1 peat moss/sand mix.

Like other carnivorous plants, they do require pure water and can be killed by fertilizer in the soil. It grows in deep water.


Germination:


The seeds are really tiny. Sow the seeds directly on the surface of your moist but not soaked soil mix.

Do not cover them with any medium.

Cover the top of the pot with clear plastic so the humidity will remain high, place them in an area with real nice strong light and keep the temperature around 25°C / 76°F.

When you see some tiny plants starting to sprout, slowly open the top of the pot, a little each day, so that the new seedlings don't go into shock from the humidity being lowered too quickly.

Germination usually occurs in a few weeks, but it can take longer, don't give up. Make sure that it gets good air circulation.


IDANATURE
 
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