VERY ILLEGAL!!!!!!!!

Not a Number

Hello, I must be going...
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How can you tell by examination if seeds were from plants in culture or collected illegally from the field?

CITES definitions
(b) "Specimen" means:

(i) any animal or plant, whether alive or dead;

(ii) in the case of an animal: for species included in Appendices I and II, any readily recognizable part or derivative thereof; and for species included in Appendix III, any readily recognizable part or derivative thereof specified in Appendix III in relation to the species; and

(iii) in the case of a plant: for species included in Appendix I, any readily recognizable part or derivative thereof; and for species included in Appendices II and III, any readily recognizable part or derivative thereof specified in Appendices II and III in relation to the species;

You have to look at the specific species listed in each Appendix. All parts and derivatives are not allowed on Appendix I Sarracenia oreophila, S. rubra spp jonesii, S. rubra ssp alabamensis.

All other Sarracenia species are covered under Appendix II with the following footnote:
All parts and derivatives, except:
a) seeds, spores and pollen (including pollinia);
b) seedling or tissue cultures obtained in vitro, in solid or liquid media, transported in sterile containers;
c) cut flowers of artificially propagated plants; and
d) fruits and parts and derivatives thereof of artificially propagated plants of the genus Vanilla.​

Endangered Species Act Definitions (Section 3.14):

(14) The term “plant” means any member of the plant kingdom, including seeds, roots and other parts thereof.​

Links:
Endangered Species Act
CITES
CITES Appendices

Now you have no excuse...
 
Since CITES pertains only to endangered species, is there anything illegal about trading non-endangered plants to and from the US? Or would I need a permit for that as well? If so, anyone know where and how much, my searches are turning up nothing. Thanks
 

Clue

clippity-clip-clip
You need a Photosanitary Certificate to import and export stuff into and out of the USA. These apply to any plants that are not sterile.
 
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Sig

Eats genetically engineered tomatoes
those are cultivated... so even if they are "technically" illegal, there's no *moral* law broken. I think that's what most of us actually care about.
 

Clue

clippity-clip-clip

It seems as though my old posts are catching up to me... :lol:

I know why Wikipedia can't be cited, and I find it humorous that I didn't at the time of that posting.




Oh, and there is actually a listing up on eBay currently of S. oreophila seeds, with the seller's location at "Sea Caves, Peyia, Cyprus" and shipping to "Worldwide".
 

jimscott

Tropical Fish Enthusiast
Whaddya think of this message that I received a few days ago:

Hi Scott,

If I drive CP's across the border with some kind of proof that they are "artificially propagated" I can bring up to 50 plants home without CITES or import/export permits. Seeing how most CP's are either TC, divisions, or hybrids and not wild collected I should have any issues with Canadian customs. There was a thread on OCPS about it: http://ocps.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=nepenthes&action=display&thread=4279

Thanks for your time
Roger
 
That is true what you were told jimscott. If you go to the CFIA website and follow a few links around they state that you are allowed to bring upto 50 houseplants across without documentation as long as they are not for commercial use or resale.
 

jimscott

Tropical Fish Enthusiast
So basically, the plants that we've been passing along to one another, from our own leaf cuttings and seedpods, are okay to give our Canadaian neighbours?
 
Only if you, or the reveiver, brings the plants over themselves, by car, or walking across. Shipping through mail still requires phyto and import permit on this side, and CITES if required.
 

Sig

Eats genetically engineered tomatoes
I'm a 10 minute drive from the Canadian border. I see a job opportunity ahead! :lol:
 
In a perfect world experienced CP growers should provide plant material for FREE to the less experienced who will cultivate it and in turn provide part of the plant material to growers who need it. They should not be sold unless all of the profit goes to saving CPs.
 

Rball

INFECTED
just wondering, with rarity and all what are these things worth in terms of sale within lines of state and regulations? would they fall in like Hamata rareness for sars and price range?
 
just wondering, with rarity and all what are these things worth in terms of sale within lines of state and regulations? would they fall in like Hamata rareness for sars and price range?

Not at all. I paid about $35 for mine, and it was a large division.
 
That is true what you were told jimscott. If you go to the CFIA website and follow a few links around they state that you are allowed to bring upto 50 houseplants across without documentation as long as they are not for commercial use or resale.

Be careful with this one. Those fifty plants belong to what is known as "household effects." The catch-22 here is that plants do not become household effects until they reach your domicile. You cannot just go on vacation and bring back a live plant protected under CITES because they are not yet part of your household effects. The 50 plant rule for the most part applies to individuals relocating entire households, e.g., someone doing an international move. This is a provision that allows you to relocate your CITES plants from a foreign domicile to a domestic domicile. You may of course get away with it because the law isn't exactly clear--even for customs agents. Unfortunately, tourists bringing back live CITES protected organisms face legal problems every year because they do not understand the definitions that accompany these regulations.
 
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