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What are some particularlly cold hardy Sarracenia?

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Sep 11, 2014
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I live in zone 6b and it gets -10 atleast once every winter, and is routinely below freezing. What are some particularlly cold hardy Sarracenia that I would be able to grow outdoors all year (if any?)

Thanks :)
 

Jcal

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Purpurea. Hardest and prettiest of them all!!!

The first part is a fact, second part opinion
 
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Thanks guys :) I already have a lot of purpurea (I should of clarified) I was looking for additional Sarracenia. Whats the second toughest of them all?
 
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The rest are all about the same as far as hardiness with the exceptions of minor, rosea, psitticina and some of the antho free varieties of other more southern species.
 

Jcal

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The rest are all about the same as far as hardiness with the exceptions of minor, rosea, psitticina and some of the antho free varieties of other more southern species.

agreed.
second hardest. purp hybrids :p
 
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Hmm okay. Do you guys think S. flava might be a good choice? According to this article (http://www.carnivorousplants.org/howto/GrowingGuides/Sarracenia.php) it is listed among the Sarracenia that might be grown in zone 6. It is worth mentioning that I have an unheated shed I store my temperates in, I think that negates most of the below 0 temperatures. Cant be sure though.
 
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Bio

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Sarracenia jonesii, S. oreophila, and S. purpurea ssp. venosa var. montana are tolerant of lower temperatures and longer freezes than the other species from the coastal plain, at least in my experience. They would be harder to acquire than most other species, however.

It should also be noted that most Sarracenia can be grown in climates much colder than they would experience naturally if they receive the appropriate protection during the winter months.
 

CorneliusSchrute

A leuco by any other name would still be as glutto
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Agreed with all of the above. I, too, live in 6b; Southeast Missouri to be precise. I have grown all of my Sarracenia outside in previous winters with minimal protection... some with none at all. Not to say it didn't make me a bit nervous during our cold dips. I have yet to loose one to cold temps, though. This includes S. flava, S. leucophylla, S. rosea, S. psittacina... basically all of them.

That said, it makes a difference whether they are potted or not. Mine are typically potted, thus my regular yet slight anxiety during cold dips in temperature. I am experimenting with keeping everything in the garage this winter to see if it affects their spring growth, however.
 
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Joined
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Agreed with all of the above. I, too, live in 6b; Southeast Missouri to be precise. I have grown all of my Sarracenia outside in previous winters with minimal protection... some with none at all. Not to say it didn't make me a bit nervous during our cold dips. I have yet to loose one to cold temps, though. This includes S. flava, S. leucophylla, S. rosea, S. psittacina... basically all of them.

That said, it makes a difference whether they are potted or not. Mine are typically potted, thus my regular yet slight anxiety during cold dips in temperature. I am experimenting with keeping everything in the garage this winter to see if it affects their spring growth, however.

Ah, thats reassuring :) I am going to try to get some S. flava then.
 
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In my experience, Sarracenia are tough plants capable of weathering very cold temperatures with adequate winter protection. Here in zone 7a in New Jersey, I've successfully overwintered Sarracenia ranging from cold-hardy S. purpurea to a particularly sensitive S. (rubra x psittacina) x leucophylla hybrid. Winters here can get down to 10F. I've found that the secret to my success is large pots and lots of pine needles. I have my Sarracenia growing in large planters that I sink into the ground, then mulch with a one foot deep layer of pine needles. Additionally, the plants are covered by a protective snow blanket all winter, so I rarely lose anything to cold damage. I think that if you pick tougher plants like S. flava or S. oreophila and keep them under a thick layer of mulch in your shed, you should be fine. If you really want to get your hands on a S. psittacina, then I think your best bet is to just stick it in the fridge when dormancy comes around.
 
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Dragoness

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Sashoke, are you able to put them in the ground?

S. leucophylla are pretty tough, too.

I grow quite a variety of Sarracenia outdoors (Zone 5) year round. Around thanksgiving, I bury them under a mountain of mulch, leaves, etc. Even my S. minor was fine (if a bit slower to take off in the spring than everyone else.)

In addition to my S. purpurea, my S. psittacina, my mystery Sarracenia (I believe it is S. alata) S. minor, S. leucophylla, all survived last winter, and that was a doozy, and their first winter outdoors to boot.

This year I have dozens more out there, but I don't want to say for sure how they did until spring, lol. Even though this winter has so far been much milder than last winter.
 
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No I dont think Im able to put them in the ground, I dont think my folks would appreciate me going and digging holes in the yard :-))

I can cover them in newspapers and then put a tarp over that though.
 
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I can cover them in newspapers and then put a tarp over that though.

Insufficient if temps go much below 20F. Its quite irrelevant what happens above ground, but if you allow the rhizome/roots to freeze solid, you risk killing the plant. Insulation is the key to overwintering the southern species.
 

Joseph Clemens

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I like the plan for overwintering Sarracenia as bare rhizomes in Ziploc® or other resealable bags, in the refrigerator.

They are safer, and it's easier to propagate them by rhizome division, from season to season.
 
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