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what's wrong with my plant?

Joined
May 16, 2007
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184
In a previous thread I reported on how my utrics were all getting overrun by a stowaway aggressive subulata type of utric.

Since then I dug everything up and try to save as many of them as possible while discarding the rest.

My longifolia leaves look very strange ever since that activity. The leaves produced are not smooth and have a very lumpy texture with little dots of yellow all over.

Is anybody familiar with this condition and what might be causing it as well as a possible remedy?

The condition was not present prior to digging up the utric. I have used fresh standard media peat perlite and the same water as before. None of the rest of the stuff has been affected except longifolia.

When I dug it up, I separated the root ball into multiple specimens. All of them seem to be exhibiting this same pattern on the leaves.

utricleaves.jpg
 

Nepenthesis

Formerly known as Pineapple
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Dec 16, 2011
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What kind of moss is that? It looks so similar to Oregon Green Moss, which is a toxic soil addition... Can't really tell from the pic.

The tips of the moss are also black/brown... Maybe that may be a sign something is wrong in the soil. What are you watering with? Not sure if this kind of plant hates mineral buildup like neps, but just my thoughts.
 
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That's sphagnum. That's what happens to it when it's too hot and doesn't have enough humidity, it blackens and rots.
 
Joined
May 16, 2007
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Yea its sphagnum.
Spider mites??!! Yikes, I think I need to get rid of the whole pot before they spread to all my other stuff!

Wonder how it got in there. These are windowsill grown and there's a screen covering the window... 2nd floor, not ground floor...
 

Not a Number

Hello, I must be going...
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Either mites or thrips. Determining which will dictate what you use for treatment as what is effective for one probably won't be effective for the other. The yellow splotches suggest spider mites however some thrips can cause similar looking damage.

Mite damage is primarily on the undersides of the leaves. Examine with a magnifier (20x recommended). Mites will be rounded, thrips elongated. You can try wiping the underside of the leaves with a white paper towel. Spider mites will show up yellow to reddish. Two spotted mites will show up brown or black.

Treat mites with a miticide. Permithrin is one of the best for spider mites. Treat thrips with Spinosad.
 
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