What's new

Worth trying to start with rhizomes?

pappydew

I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me.
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
1,212
Location
Miami, FL
So I've never really delved into the Sarracenia world, but now that I have a south-facing patio I want to start over with outdoor growing. I'm in north central FL (9a) so "winter" is maybe a few nights here or there that get down in the high 20's/low 30's. I'm honestly not even sure what the growing season would be here and how people deal with dormancy in this climate. Almost all of my experience thus far with CP's has been inside, and most of the advice out there regarding Sarrs is for the 98% of people who at least have to acknowledge winter.

Which is why I'm curious if it would be worth it for me to start off with rhizomes at this point of the season, or should I wait until spring and go with more established plants?
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
3,413
Location
Boston, MA
You can go either way, rhizomes or established plants. Doesn't really matter. All Sarracenia species and hybrids (with the possible exception of S.purpurea purpurea) will be very easy and almost effortless (relatively speaking) plants to grow in your area.
 
Last edited:

dionae

sarracenia lover
Joined
Nov 29, 2010
Messages
1,963
Location
KY
I agree with johnny. Sarrs would love your climate. Id jump right in.
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2013
Messages
399
Location
New Haven, CT
Makes no difference in my opinion. Some people think they are easier to ship dormant, especially if you trim the pitchers off.
 

Joseph Clemens

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 9, 2002
Messages
2,539
Location
Tucson, Arizona
I hope you realize that many are native to your area. You're right smack in the middle of Sarracenia country. It would be rather simple to create a suitable outdoor growing area, potted or even in the ground, if your soil is suitable and with appropriate watering.

Your natural climate should suit them well. If I were you, I'd obtain or create a three or four inch deep tray, that would hold water, to put them in. Build a chicken wire enclosure (to keep critters from bothering them - especially squirrels). Then just keep the tray filled with water, then trim off the old growth as it dies away each season.
 
Last edited:

pappydew

I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me.
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
1,212
Location
Miami, FL
S. minor and flava (I think) are the only ones that naturally stretch this far south/east, but there's no doubt most all will like the climate here.

I just wasn't sure if starting rhizomes now would be worth it since for most people dormancy lasts, what, another 2-3 months or so?

Unfortunately all my outdoor space is on the second floor of an apartment building. Believe me, I'd put in a bog in a heart beat if I had my own land. I have enough room though that I might try some bigger tubs...but they'll at least have to be potted.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 9, 2010
Messages
973
Location
Athens, GA
I have Sarracenia in a greenhouse and they don't get lower than 60F nights all winter. However, they do get a natural (i.e. shortening) photoperiod in winter. They go into dormancy and emerge, with flowers, just fine.

I would load up on all the Sarrs you could ever dream of owning, and more than likely they'll have no trouble. Rhizomes aren't dead and lifeless-they can still sense the temperature and daylength and decide for themselves what they want to do.
 
Joined
Jul 22, 2007
Messages
180
Location
Northern Florida
S. minor and flava (I think) are the only ones that naturally stretch this far south/east, but there's no doubt most all will like the climate here.

I just wasn't sure if starting rhizomes now would be worth it since for most people dormancy lasts, what, another 2-3 months or so?

Unfortunately all my outdoor space is on the second floor of an apartment building. Believe me, I'd put in a bog in a heart beat if I had my own land. I have enough room though that I might try some bigger tubs...but they'll at least have to be potted.

Dormancy lasts another 2-3 months for northern states, not for us here in FL. I'm in zone 9 as well, should only be a few more weeks for us, so rhizomes are perfectly fine to start now. You're also on the second floor, so frost damage to a rhizome is extremely unlikely, even if we get hit with another cold front before spring. Go for it, Sarracenia do great in this part of FL!
 

pappydew

I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me.
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
1,212
Location
Miami, FL
Dormancy lasts another 2-3 months for northern states, not for us here in FL. I'm in zone 9 as well, should only be a few more weeks for us, so rhizomes are perfectly fine to start now. You're also on the second floor, so frost damage to a rhizome is extremely unlikely, even if we get hit with another cold front before spring. Go for it, Sarracenia do great in this part of FL!

Thanks Taargus! Glad to see another north FL grower! I'm super pumped to make use of the plant-friendly climate here.
 
Top