User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  1
Likes Likes:  3
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 29

Thread: Growing intermediate/highland plants HOT

  1. #17
    hcarlton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greeley, CO, USA
    Posts
    4,057
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Confirming that a plant is doing well in one's conditions when it comes to Nepenthes equals seeing good growth for exceeding a year as slow as they grow and can react to unwelcome conditions; with reinwardtiana (even highland locales have capacity to withstand more intermediate-lowland conditions naturally) and ventricosa doing okay for that length, then moving up to the next level of more picky plants now is appropriate, but then should take a year or so with a new batch (especially if any show struggling issues, smaller leaves, burning etc.) before the next are brought in (mirabilis globosa x hamata is at best considered lowland-intermediate to true intermediate as well, with globosa being a true lowlander and hamata a semi-tolerant highland species, so not one that should be unexpected to do fairly well in hot regions; same applies to most any lowland/highland cross, as lowland traits often help tolerance along with hybrid vigor, so they will nearly always be easier). Species like stenophylla, ephippiata, pilosa, or other species in the bottom-middle rungs of true highland habitats could be a next try. Any that die within a week or two almost certainly had issues to start with and probably shouldn't really be considered in figuring if conditions are truly appropriate. Once the somewhat more fussy species are doing well, then moving on to truly expensive, truly highland or ultra-highland species is recommended (the high peak species like mira, attenboroughii, rajah, edwardsiana -which might be an exception, but is a costly one to experiment on- are included).

    Note: every single Nepenthes species is protected under CITES Appendices I and II. Restrictions apply to all but artificial hybrids, and TC plants are exempt; permits for otherwise artificially propagated plants typically covers the rest. The plants you have I wasn't pointing note at and did not mention related to this (save examples of seeds I've seen offered of same species that were also poached), but the seed acquisitions such as "kinabaluensis" and "macrophylla" (which, if actually those taxa, were also taken out of national parks, breaking even more laws). As you've purchased from places like BCP, and is Andreas is willing to try shipping to your area, those taxa are carried by them too, and they are also more likely to have clones already selected that will be more apt to thrive in artificial conditions. Wild seeds, far less guarantee. And, I was saying avoid making such purchases again; just about everyone has made that folly at least once in the hobby, the avoiding it moving forward is the stressed point and the only thing I said in my first post on it.

    And I'll try to make it clear: it's the action I am displeased about (and actions can be avoided or amended), not the person. No, I don't have a low opinion of you, and I am sorry if the words written say otherwise (I am a blunt, to the point writer and am still working on that aspect; I sometimes come across worse than I ever want to and I have been fighting this), and I am sorry if the posts come across as trying to suggest getting rid of all the plants you have, not the intent either. Avoiding getting other possibly finicky or highly valuable conservation-wise plants until the ones you have now are certain to be thriving is the rec I had concerning trying highlanders in general, what was trying to be stressed. What I've gained in my own experience as well as watching others trying to grow plants in places those plants don't normally want to grow is that it's an uphill battle to get them to do well there, as they need those cooler days, much cooler nights or otherwise eventually fizzle. Even some big nurseries here have dropped trying to grow certain plants just because where they are located never will permit it, but a smaller space that can be modified far enough might work. The two big points though are still: cool days, cool nights, and whatever it takes to make that happen. If you succeed with this, and plants grow well, then figuring how to propagate and get them spread to others with specifics for your location is the next step.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  2. #18
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)


    Thanks. I get your point. TBH, I didn't realize that all nepenthes were covered under CITES. I found rajah and khasiana on it. Maybe one way to do the larger community some good is to publish a list of the legal status of various plants. Conservation/endangered status is known for many. But legal status. If you find what you believe to be collected seeds, what to check for. Species, legal collections, not endangered plants, etc. Local laws, international laws, etc.

    Blunt is fine and your questioning is valid and I did answer it to the best of my ability. It was more that you didn't speak about the growing which was my interest that was missing, I guess.

    I guess it comes down to rolling up my sleeves and giving those fellows the best growing I can.

    On a tangent, a lot of laws formed in the stratosphere, and realities on the ground are often in different worlds altogether. I don't even pretend to have the foggiest on ground realities where the nepenthes are collected. It could be interesting to connect with forest related activists in those countries to see how important seed collecting is, its legal status, threats and so on. Also the kind of people who do the seed collecting. Who they are, how they interact with the forests...

    To give an example, India is allegedly interested in preserving its forests. All that it amounts to in practical action is oppression of the forest dwellers, while deforestation, selling vast swathes to private interests and so on goes unchecked. A lot fo forest produce is made/collected "illegally" by the forest dwellers. But here's the thing. They have lived there for generations, also tending to the plants which have thrived under their care and the "collecting" is more symbiotic than parasitic, so to say. Evictions of those people moved them to wholesale destitution and irreparable poverty, while clearing the way for the poachers, deforesters of various breeds, and so on. A lot of endangered forest produce is more at risk from "development" and pollution.

    To take an even bigger step back, seeing humans as one of the species on the planet, so to say (as opposed to our current view as God and responsible for determining what happens to every other species), I suppose we have also turned into a way various seeds propagate far and wide (or get stolen and wasted/eaten)

    I am not saying this is what happens in those countries. What I am saying is that I don't know, and this is just one example of why I don't immediately read a rule and jump to back it up. I guess I see a lot of greys.

    Regardless, I doubt I'll be spending more on highlanders unless I get notable success with these. Seeds or otherwise.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  3. #19
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For eg, saving the plants and preventing "human propagation" so to say is no guarantee that those plants living in a delicate ecology aren't going to die from say... climate change or groundwater pollution. I agree that they must be saved, but do we actually know that taking those seeds is resulting in declining populations? Heck, I fight to not waste seeds opening a packet in a breezeless room. Is it even possible to take out all the nepenthes seeds from a forest? Do we even have enough nepenthes seed buyers in the whole world to justify the expense of the number of regular visits to the forest it would take for the sellers?

    Again, this is an example of where my mind goes in order to form an informed opinion on the subject. As opposed to 'small population in the wild, come down on the heads of anyone who actually loves and wants the damn things'. How many people who actually live in forests shape conservation laws?

    Another example, campanulata. It was presumed extinct when forest fires decimated the only known population and there were no specimens in collections either. Would someone having sold those seeds on ebay and those plants growing in random greenhouses, windowsills, balconies and terrariums then be a good thing or bad? Then a new population was found, then another. It could just as easily have been extinct. And there ARE many species gone extinct.

    I don't necessarily see it as a bad thing for species that are found in only one place to be "human propagated" far and wide - unless we see decreased populations, lack of young trees, etc and it can be attributed to most/all the seeds being stolen.

    It is just an alternative view. AND an uninformed one, I say myself, since these are all things I consider but not confirmed facts. This is not an excuse, merely some thoughts I have on the subject.

    And of course the flip side is true as well. Drosera regia/magnifica/etc would be gone if that tiny population were stripped of seeds regularly.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  4. #20
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So... A funny thing happened. I was looking at my seedlings with a magnifying glass (don't ask) when I realized that there were several without pitchers!!! I was like "don't tell me you highland snobs you won't even grow your freaking seedling pitchers for me in this glorious weather...." I set off to examine how many agents @hcarlton had planted in my balcony



    Only to realize the poor darlings aren't pitcherless at all. They are trying to grow teeny tiny tendrils to make their pitchers on and my lowly lowland self didn't even recognize what was happening. Are you frickin kidding me? Highlanders want to make tendrils for their third pitcher? Whoa. Surreal. So. Much. Delight.



    awww....

    Photos are bad, but these guys are tiny.

    Edit: Some seedlings are forming tendrils on their second pitcher itself. What sorcery is this?
    Last edited by Vidyut; 07-11-2019 at 09:48 AM.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  5. #21
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The photos are bad. these guys are way super. Fresh microgreen color with some pales and some wannabe reds.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  6. #22
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Though bad news for my sole kinnabaluensis seedling grown so far. I.... lost it. The pot toppled on its side - I still don't know how. No one had gone to the balcony. There is netting so birds can't get in. Hasn't been windy... anyway, when I straightened the pot, I can't find the seedling. I searched through the sphagnum that had come loose, it isn't there, I searched the pots below the shelf if it had fallen through... can't see it. Will continue the search, but unless I find it soon, I fear I've lost it.

    Unless..... a few years later I find a kannabaluensis popping out in the middle of Drosera x Andromeda...
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  7. #23
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by nepenthesl0ve View Post
    i wish you luck with your highlanders! I grow in intermediate conditions (85F day 65F night) and grow hybrids and highlanders pretty well.

    i tried the highland mix seeds as well and mine look about same as yours. was warned after that they are probably a very low value species sold as a mix to get higher price and interest. we shall find out eventually!
    Have you posted photos anywhere? I'd like to see and observe.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  8. #24
    Vidyut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Nalasopara (near Bombay/Mumbai)
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This nepenthes sibuyanensis seedling sent a tendril that managed to lift a single strand of sphagnum it tried to hide under to make its pitcher. lol.



    Another seedling was not as shy. The pitcher was in the depression next to it. I lifted it out to click photo.



    The blackened pitcher had come with the plant. It was sort of squashed and hung around for a while before dying.

    I'm planning to click photos and update daily or every few days to keep myself encouraged.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Looking For (To Buy) Nepenthes Intermediate-Highland Hybrid Cuttings
    By ambystoma in forum Terraforums Classifieds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-28-2018, 11:47 AM
  2. When to transfer seedling to intermediate/highland conditions?
    By naich in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-17-2018, 06:59 PM
  3. Highland or intermediate nepenthes.
    By Rareraven in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 10-18-2015, 03:01 PM
  4. Intermediate Indoor Growing Area
    By DonH in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-24-2012, 02:14 AM
  5. Growing Highland Neps in Singapore
    By eBeyonder in forum Foreign Carnivorous Plant Resources
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-16-2006, 04:39 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •