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Thread: Can they be propagated this way?

  1. #9

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    I tried leaf with one of mine (the enymae hybrid) when I got it and one leaf fell off. It sent out inch long roots but recently fungus attcked and so I had to chuck it. I will try it again soon and let you know how it goes.

  2. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Flip_Side_the_Pint @ Mar. 22 2005,11:35)]nepenthes don't have rhizomes(sp)
    What's this then? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

    http://www.hbs.ne.jp/home/s-yamada/Dsc04595.jpg

  3. #11
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Nep_grower @ Mar. 23 2005,7:41)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Flip_Side_the_Pint @ Mar. 22 2005,11:35)]nepenthes don't have rhizomes(sp)
    What's this then? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

    http://www.hbs.ne.jp/home/s-yamada/Dsc04595.jpg
    a very extensive root system on a very old plant. You can see where the main stem was cut and then the basals formed.

    A rhizome is something like a ginger root.

    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  4. #12
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Good question. Looks like a rhizhome of a very old plant of N. thorelli, could just be old root stock as well such as in this photo:

    http://www.hbs.ne.jp/home/s-yamada/Dsc04591.jpg

  5. #13

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    Thorelii, some mirabilis, anamensis (smilesii) and 'Viking' do have a rhizome like tuber that can be divided kinda like a Sarracenia. It is also interesting to note that the indo-china Neps do experience a dry season and a monsoon season.

  6. #14
    Flip_Side_the_Pint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Trent @ Mar. 24 2005,4:55)]Thorelii, some mirabilis, anamensis (smilesii) and 'Viking' do have a rhizome like tuber that can be divided kinda like a Sarracenia. It is also interesting to note that the indo-china Neps do experience a dry season and a monsoon season.
    whoa thats crazy.

    Do they experience a slow in growth or a "dormancy" ? I never knew this. So some neps have them and some don't? or do they all have them but they are less pronounced in more species?
    https://www.instagram.com/hull.jess/ (I post pics of my plants there)

  7. #15

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    Interesting thought there. It would seem that some neps do have a root system that resembles a rhizome. I have a N. ventricosa now, it has two offshoots, and it has a large root system, i can see it because my watering has washed the soil away from the base of the plant. It looks like a big ol'e chunk o root. I may give propogation a try via "rhizome"
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  8. #16

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    We give our N. kampotiana a rest every winter. It naturally starts to die back. It looks like we've loosing the plant, but we then hold back on water and it looks terrible. Around February new ground shoots start up. We give it only enough water to for them to grow. By May, we treat it like all other lowland Neps. Clyde Bramblett recommended this treatment. He told us many people lost plants in winter by thinking they were dead or dying, and either overwatered or threw them out.
    The thorelii's don't seem to need this dry spell, even though in nature it occurs. Our 'Viking's are just getting established, so we will wait to see. By the way, they are breaking new ground shoots along the length of the rhizomes.

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