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Thread: Nice color

  1. #9
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    No, thats a lower. Upper pitchers can be just as similar as lowers, but the tendril attachment and features are key. Uppers, as previously stated, have a characteristic loop in them and lowers generally have a straight sturdy tendril attachment. Uppers are generally less colored and can have reduced or flared peristome, an example would be N. inermis (reduced or none) N. x Dyeriana or N. northiana (flared).

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    so a strong curve without a loop is still lower (intermediate), and it must loop to be an upper, right?

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    It doesn't have to be a roller coaster loop, but it will twist and turn a lot. Once my plants make a good example of that I'll post it.

    For proof, check pages 38 ,252, and 258 of The Savage Garden. All of these have pics of upper pitchers with tendrils that do not make a full loop.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

  4. #12
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Pretty much, but a real upper is designated, not only by the tendril loop, but by the peristome regression, or augmentation of it, and the tendril attachment, which is usually at the back bottom of the pitcher.

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    another Q.

    is the pitcher the auctual leaf, and the leaf blade part of the petiole?

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    As far as i know, yes.
    Update: Parents convinced to allow me to keep greenhouse heated over winter. Most species will not be lost. Too lazy to update growlist.

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    That is true with Dionaea but I'm not sure about Nepenthes. There are some plants (grapefruits, I believe. Maybe it's figs) that have a leaf which shrinks to nothing but a rib and then broadens again. It is not as dramatic as Nepenthes, which have long tendrils, but still. Nepenthes leaves are far more leaf-like than those of Dionaea.

    -D. Lybrand
    Check my growlist! Nothing currently available for trade...

  8. #16
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Technically if you want to be nitty gritty about it, the actual physical leaf we humans name on a Nepenthes is the leaf petiole, the tendril is a special appendage and the actual true leaf is the pitcher itself. Associating a Nepenthes petiole with a Dionaea petiole is a fairly good comparison.

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