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Thread: Fed my VFTs bloodworms...

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    Fed my VFTs bloodworms...

    On July 8, 2017 my VFTs were looking pretty darn good Fed my VFTs bloodworms...-image-jpg.
    And then I fed them what I thought was going to be received as a delightful blob of bloodworm paste. I did not just haphazardly create this concoction, I followed specific instructions from growsundews.com. (I'm not placing blame, I love that site!) Since feeding the traps moderate amounts bloodworm bunches and live bugs 1-2 times a month, the plants are on a steady decline. New traps are appearing and turning black before fully forming, meanwhile two stems of flowers came up from the
    most left VFT in this picture Fed my VFTs bloodworms...-image-jpg and I snipped them off quickly.
    Any idea what might be causing this sad decline?
    Last edited by pooparella; 10-14-2017 at 06:09 PM.

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    Your plants are suffering from a severe lack of proper lighting, nothing to do with the food. Full sun is necessary.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Your plants are suffering from a severe lack of proper lighting, nothing to do with the food. Full sun is necessary.
    Really? Because this is the second year I've had them in the same spot, and they came out of dormancy and grew up looking happy (first photo). I probably should've mentioned that the 2nd pic isn't good and was taken at night (Whoops). They sit in an east-facing window with a solid crew of other CPs, all of which are healthy. I realize anything is possible, but the only variable that's changed has been the feeding.
    Last edited by pooparella; 10-14-2017 at 05:55 PM.

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    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
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    I agree with hcarlton, the second photo shows classic signs of light starvation. The elongated petioles in the first photo also indicate lack of sufficient light. Also, when food in a trap is too large it will cause that trap to expire and turn brown. All you need is a tiny dab of bloodworms in a couple traps per plant on occasion. They donít need much and I think some people growing flytraps under artificial conditions often over feed them. They would be much happier growing outside in full sun catching their own food, but if that is not possible you should provide them the same light intensity as they would get outside in full sun as well as the same seasonal cues mother nature would if they were outside for proper dormancy period. Improper photoperiod throughout the year, as well as improper dormancy, can confuse and weaken them over time. The plants in your second photo look very weak and unless rectified (start getting the light they need), they may not make it through another dormancy.

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    Thanks for the advice. I will definitely move all my VFTs outside once all the fires and debris in the air subside. My poor CPs outside are full of ash right now (which is nothing compared to losing one's house and possessions, of course - I am SO grateful we've been lucky so far!). I have a few VFTs along with Droseras and Sarrs outside, but I've not moved the indoor VFTs outside because we seem to have every bug known to man and then some here in Napa, and I've had problems with aphids and thrips outside among other issues. But I'll do anything necessary to make these former beauties lovely and healthy once again!

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    I am a CPaholic... DJ57's Avatar
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    It might be better to wait until spring to move your flytraps outside since we are now in October and heading into the winter months. At this time of year flytraps growing in a natural environment are already heading into dormancy. If it is possible, move them now to a sunny window sill where they will receive some full sun part of the day and bright indirect sun the rest of the day. Follow your normal routine for dormancy for this winter, then in spring begin the process of acclimating your flytraps to full sun outside by putting them in an area that receives only partial sun but bright indirect sunlight and slowly move them out to get more full sun over the course of a couple weeks or so. You may see some leaf burn in the beginning but new growth will be acclimated and do fine. When they have fully adjusted to your outside conditions over the growing season you can leave them outside to experience a natural dormancy through winter. Dormancy is not triggered by cooler temperatures alone, photoperiod/natural seasonal cues play a major role in this process. Starting their acclimation to outdoor living in spring will help reset their clock so to speak.

    I encourage others with more experience with this indoor-to-outdoor acclimation process to chime in here as I grow my flytraps outside year round here in the Pacific Northwest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ57 View Post
    It might be better to wait until spring to move your flytraps outside since we are now in October and heading into the winter months. At this time of year flytraps growing in a natural environment are already heading into dormancy. If it is possible, move them now to a sunny window sill where they will receive some full sun part of the day and bright indirect sun the rest of the day. Follow your normal routine for dormancy for this winter, then in spring begin the process of acclimating your flytraps to full sun outside by putting them in an area that receives only partial sun but bright indirect sunlight and slowly move them out to get more full sun over the course of a couple weeks or so. You may see some leaf burn in the beginning but new growth will be acclimated and do fine. When they have fully adjusted to your outside conditions over the growing season you can leave them outside to experience a natural dormancy through winter. Dormancy is not triggered by cooler temperatures alone, photoperiod/natural seasonal cues play a major role in this process. Starting their acclimation to outdoor living in spring will help reset their clock so to speak.

    I encourage others with more experience with this indoor-to-outdoor acclimation process to chime in here as I grow my flytraps outside year round here in the Pacific Northwest.
    That sounds like good advice, thanks so much! I appreciate any and all suggestions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pooparella View Post
    On July 8, 2017 my VFTs were looking pretty darn good Fed my VFTs bloodworms...-image-jpg.
    And then I fed them what I thought was going to be received as a delightful blob of bloodworm paste. I did not just haphazardly create this concoction, I followed specific instructions from growsundews.com. (I'm not placing blame, I love that site!) Since feeding the traps moderate amounts bloodworm bunches and live bugs 1-2 times a month, the plants are on a steady decline. New traps are appearing and turning black before fully forming, meanwhile two stems of flowers came up from the
    most left VFT in this picture Fed my VFTs bloodworms...-image-jpg and I snipped them off quickly.
    Any idea what might be causing this sad decline?
    As other said, they are suffering because of the light. I don't know why some recommend vft for windowsill, they need full sun and good air flow. I lost my first plants growing them at windowsill and when I decided to give outdoors a try, they were growing well and began to have success with them.

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